Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus

Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus

Scientific Name

Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus (G.Frank & A.B.Lau) N.P.Taylor

Common Names

Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus, Rainbow Cactus, Ruby Rainbow, Arizona Ruby Rainbow Hedgehog, Pink Comb Cactus

Synonyms

Echinocereus pectinatus var. rubispinus, Echinocereus pectinatus var. rubrispinus, Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus, Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubrispinus

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Pachycereeae
Genus: Echinocereus

Description

Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus is a small columnar cactus with erect, cylindrical stems covered with short pink spines. The stems grow up to 10 inches (25 cm) tall and up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) in diameter. Flowers are up to 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter, pinkish-red, magenta or red with white throats, and appear in late spring.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9a to 11b: from 20 °F (−6.7 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

If you can successfully grow other globular cactus, you can most likely grow Echinocereus well. One of the key factors in success with these is avoiding any hint of wet soil. Because their root systems are weak, they are especially prone to root rot, which will eventually kill your plant. Otherwise, they thrive on a program of intense bright light, slight water, and a steady diet of light fertilizer. These cacti are vulnerable to mealybugs and aphids.

Echinocereus are slow-growing cacti that should only need repotting every other year or so. You can prolong the time to repotting by removing plantlets and potting them up in their own pots. When repotting a cactus, carefully remove it from its pot and knock away any clumped soil. These plants tend to be shallow-rooted with weak root systems, so take care not to damage their roots.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Echinocereus.

Origin

Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus is native to Mexico.

Links

  • Back to genus Echinocereus
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo Gallery


Subscribe now and be up to date with our latest news and updates.





Taking Care Of Echinocereus Rigidissimus Rubrispinus “Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus”

Ideal conditions

Echinocereus Rigidissimus Rubrispinus “Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus” grows the best outdoors since it requires plenty of light. In fact, surviving in temperatures down to 20 degrees F (-6.7 degrees C), the Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus is also quite frost-hardy, so it should do good outdoors in winter as well.

Indoor growing is also possible with this cactus, but it will be a little more challenging due to the cactus’ light needs.

Watering

The Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus should be watered only once its soil is dry to the touch. Like many other succulents, this cactus is drought-tolerant and requires little water.

One thing to keep in mind with Rainbow Hedgehog Cacti is that they tend to have weak root systems that are very prone to root rot if overwatered. So be careful with how much water you supply to your cactus.

In winter, water the Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus only once or twice per month, or don’t water it at all. Dormant in winter, this cactus requires little to no water to survive.

Where to plant

Plant your Echinocereus Rigidissimus Rubrispinus “Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus” in porous, fast-draining soil. Such soil will reduce the risk of waterlogging and root rot.

Consider adding mineral grit like coarse sand or perlite in the mix as well. Given how sensitive the roots of this cactus are to water, add mineral grit in at least a 1:1 ratio, though you may try to go as high as 60% or 70%.

Since the Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus requires partial to full sunlight, you should keep it outdoors. Indoor growing is also possible, but only if you have a spot that receives direct sunlight all day long. You may also use grow lights for inside growth, but keep in mind that natural light is preferable.

Whether indoors or outdoors, be sure to place a sunshade over the cactus or move it to a shaded location during extreme heat.

In winter, you might also want to move your Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus inside to protect it from low temperatures.

General care information

Echinocereus Rigidissimus Rubrispinus “Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus” is a slow-growing cactus, and a steady diet of a fertilizer diluted to 1/4-1/2 strength should allow you to ensure successful growth. Fertilize the plant with a cactus fertilizer in spring and summer once or twice a month, depending on the strength of your fertilizer.

You probably won’t have to repot the Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus often since it’s a slow grower. Repotting every other spring or summer should do fine. However, given how sensitive the roots of this cactus are, you may want to repot it every year – this will allow you to check on the health of the roots.

But when repotting this cactus, be very gentle to avoid damage to the roots.


Plants→Echinocereus→Arizona Ruby Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus)

Common names:
(2) Arizona Ruby Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus
(1) Sonoran Rainbow Cactus
Pink Comb Cactus
Arizona Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus
Alicoche
General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit:Cactus/Succulent
Life cycle:Perennial
Sun Requirements:Full Sun to Partial Shade
Minimum cold hardiness:Zone 8a -12.2 °C (10 °F) to -9.4 °C (15 °F)
Plant Height :Up to 6-12 inches
Flowers:Showy
Flower Color:Pink
Purple
Suitable Locations:Xeriscapic
Resistances:Drought tolerant
Propagation: Other methods:Offsets
Containers:Suitable in 1 gallon
Needs excellent drainage in pots
Miscellaneous:Tolerates poor soil
With thorns/spines/prickles/teeth

Strikingly beautiful and photogenic cactus with abundant red spines in a pectinate arrangement, clasping the stem. Solitary. Flowers are large and pink, red or magenta, with white throats. Provide strong light and excellent drainage in cultivation. Do not overwater.

This subspecies differs from Alicoche (Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rigidissimus) in its more abundant, redder spines and smaller diameter, also its origin (Chihuahua, not AZ/NM/SON).

Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus by Monetwwqi Aug 29, 2018 9:52 AM 3
What makes these cactus pink? by Codycode Aug 7, 2020 9:29 PM 6
Sempervivum Chat & photos 2018 by CDsSister Apr 10, 2019 5:14 PM 3,385
Cactus and succulents chat by Baja_Costero Mar 26, 2021 9:22 AM 9,605

Times are presented in US Central Standard Time

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "muscari"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.


Echinocereus Species, Arizona Ruby Rainbow Hedgehog, Pink Comb Cactus, Sonoran Rainbow Cactus

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Mar 9, 2006, franj from Tucson, AZ wrote:

A beautifull plant flowering or not. I've had one in the ground for ten years and it has flowered reliably. The only downside is the flowers leave an unsightly scar when they drop off.

On Apr 23, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

The subspecies 'rigidissumus' has stems that reach over 4 inches thick with 15-23 radial spines per areole.
The subspecies 'rubispinus' has stems that only get about 2 1/2 inches thick with 30-35 radial spines per areole. The spines are also more Ruby/pinkish colored compared to the 'rigidissimus' subspecies.
The flowers on both are bright pinkish-red or magenta or red with white throats.

On Jul 14, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

commonly sold cactus, often part of a cactus/succulent variety pot in home garden centers. Small columnar species with very short pink spines. I have rotted several of these, but if you don't overwater them, they do OK, at least in zone 9b


Echinocereus rigidissimus subsp. rubispinus - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus (G.Frank & A.B.Lau) N.P.Taylor
Cactaceae Consensus Init. 3: 9. 1997

Origin and Habitat: Mexico (northern Sonora, north-western Chihuahua
Habitat: The reported habitat preference for limestone is erroneous this species is a calcifuge, preferring soils poor in lime and usually acid.

Description: Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus is one of the local form of Echinocereus rigidissimus. It distinguishes for the very short dusty red-purple spines (not pink and white) and dull purple-red (not green) stigma lobes. It is also up to 50% smaller in all its parts. Its blossoms are bright magenta red and are large and showy in comparison with the small size of the stem. Its unique-looking spination makes it one the the best Echinocereus species.
Habit: It is a small columnar cactus that when mature will form a clump about to 60 cm wide by 25 cm tall.
Stems: Erect, short cylindrical, only get about 7cm thick.
Radial spines: 30-35 pectinate per areole and 6-10 mm in length in red and white bands, but more ruby/violet coluoured compared to the 'rigidissimus' subspecies, witch makes it a very attractive cactus. This is a Mexican form and does not turn grey like the Arizona form.
Flowers: Huge up to 10 cm wide. Beautiful bright pinkish-red or magenta or red with white throats. Blooms in ring on the crown of the stem in spring. The only downside is the flowers leave an unsightly scar when they drop off.
Fruits: Globose, greenish or dark purplish brownish very spiny, 3 cm in diameter, pulp white. Fruiting 3 months after flowering

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echinocereus rigidissimus group

  • Echinocereus rigidissimus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8509/Echinocereus_rigidissimus'> Echinocereus rigidissimus (Engelm.) Rose : Stems up to 10 cm thick with 15-23 radial pectinated spines per areole that hide the body of the plant. Each year’s growth is differentiated by differently coloured band of spines, hence the common name Arizona Rainbow.
  • Echinocereus rigidissimus f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/21789/Echinocereus_rigidissimus_f._cristata'> Echinocereus rigidissimus f. cristata hort. : Crested form.
  • Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/10573/Echinocereus_rigidissimus_subs._rubispinus'> Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus (G.Frank & A.B.Lau) N.P.Taylor : (a.k.a. Ruby Rainbow) has stems that only get about 7 cm thick with 30-35 shorter radial spines per areole. The spines are also more Ruby/pinkish coluoured compared to the 'rigidissimus' subspecies and are some of the showiest in the cactus kingdom.
  • Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus f. albiflorus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/21787/Echinocereus_rigidissimus_subs._rubispinus_f._albiflorus'> Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus f. albiflorus hort. : has white flowers and paler creamy white spines, all the other characteristics namely size and shape of spines, stems, flowers, fruits, roots etc.it is comparable to the standard from.

Notes: Echinocereus rigidissimus, lacking central spines, belongs to the E. reichenbachii group, unrelated to the superficially similar E. pectinatus group, which has at least microscopically visible stubs of central spines. It sometimes occurs with E. pseudopectinatus but without evidence of hybridization.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey “The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass” Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug./2011
2) David Hunt, Nigel Taylor “The New Cactus Lexicon” DH Books, 2006
3) Edward F. Anderson “The Cactus Family” Timber Press, 2001
4) Nathaniel Lord Britton, Joseph Nelson Rose “Cactaceae: Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family” Volume 3, 1922
5) Paul S Martin, Davis Yetman, Mark Fishbein, Phil Jenkins, Thomas R. van Devender, & Rebecca K. Wilson "Gentry's Río Mayo Plants: The Tropical Deciduous Forest & Environs of Northwest Mexico" University of Arizona Press, 1998
6) Natt Noyes Dodge, Jeanne R. Janish "Flowers of the Southwest Deserts" Western National Parks Association, 01/gen/1985


Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Andrea B.
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Carolina González
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubispinus (Echinocereus rigidissimus subs. rubispinus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

Cultivation and Propagation: Echinocereus rigidissimus var. rubrispinus is not the easiest cactus to grow, but when grown well it is very attractive. Rot easily it is sensitive to overwatering (rot prone), so perfect soil drainage is a must.
Soil: It prefer a neutral to slightly acidic compost with plenty of extra grit.
Watering: Best if watered with rain water and given an occasional tonic of sequestrated iron.
Exposition: In the summer they need an airy location in bright sun well watered when it's hot. To achieve the best spine colours give these plants lots of sun. In the winter light, cool, and absolutely dry conditions.
Hardiness: Very cold resistant above approx -12° C or less for short periods of time. In mild climate it may grow well when planted freely outside in well-drained soil.
Propagation: Seeds.


Watch the video: Echinocereus!