Echinocereus pulchellus

Echinocereus pulchellus

Scientific Name

Echinocereus pulchellus (Mart.) Seitz

Synonyms

Echinocactus pulchellus (basionym), Echinocereus pulchellus subsp. pulchellus, Cereus amoena, Cereus amoenus, Cereus pulchellus, Echinocereus amoenus, Echinonyctanthus pulchellus, Echinopsis amoena, Echinopsis pulchella

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Pachycereeae
Genus: Echinocereus

Description

Echinocereus pulchellus is a small cactus that produces offsets sparingly once it is quite mature and well established. The stems are hemispherical, with short tubercles and up to 1.6 inches (4 cm) diameter. The tubercles are arranged in ribs, sometimes subtly spiraled. The spines are inconspicuous and in clusters of 3 to 7. The flowers are showy, pinkish-white to hot-pink, and up to 1.6 inches (4 cm) in diameter.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 8b to 11b: from 15 °F (−9.4 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

If you can successfully grow other globular cactus, you can most likely grow Echinocereus well. One of the key factors in success with these is avoiding any hint of wet soil. Because their root systems are weak, they are especially prone to root rot, which will eventually kill your plant. Otherwise, they thrive on a program of strong, bright light, slight water, and a steady diet of light fertilizer. These cacti are vulnerable to mealybugs and aphids.

Echinocereus are slow-growing cacti that should only need repotting every other year or so. You can prolong the time to repotting by removing plantlets and potting them up in their pots. When repotting a cactus, carefully remove it from its pot and knock away any clumped soil. These plants tend to be shallow-rooted with weak root systems, so take care not to damage their roots. See more at How to Grow and Care for Echinocereus.

Origin

Echinocereus pulchellus is native to Mexico.

Links

  • Back to genus Echinocereus
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Echinocereus

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

On May 11, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

During drought time this species shrinks into the ground.
The 'pulchellus' subspecies has stems that are 1 to 2 inches thick with 9 to 12 ribs and 3 to 7 inconspicuous spines per areole. The flowers are pink or white.
The 'acanthosetus' subspecies has stems that are 0.8 to 1 inch thick with 9 ribs usually and 5 to 8 flailing hairlike spines. The flowers are magenta to white.
The 'sharpii' subspecies has darker colored stems in comparison to the other subspecies that are 0.8 to 2.8 inches thick with 11 to 17 ribs and 7 to 14 spines per areole. The flowers are magenta to white.
The 'weinbergii' subspecies has stems that are 2.4 to 5.1 inches thick with 14 or 15 ribs and 8 to 11 spines per areole. The pink diurnal flower petals are narrowly acute in shape.
T. read more he 'amoenus' variety has 5 inch wide stems, 10 to 14 ribs & on the young areoles it has 6 to 8 short spines with the lower spine being the longest. The older areoles are devoid of spines. The flowers are magenta.


Echinocereus

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Echinocereus (ek-in-oh-KER-ee-us) (Info)
Species: pulchellus (pul-KEL-us) (Info)
Synonym:Cereus pulchellus
Synonym:Echinocactus pulchellus
Synonym:Echinocereus aguirrei
Synonym:Echinocereus pulchellus subsp. pulchellus

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On May 11, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

During drought time this species shrinks into the ground.
The 'pulchellus' subspecies has stems that are 1 to 2 inches thick with 9 to 12 ribs and 3 to 7 inconspicuous spines per areole. The flowers are pink or white.
The 'acanthosetus' subspecies has stems that are 0.8 to 1 inch thick with 9 ribs usually and 5 to 8 flailing hairlike spines. The flowers are magenta to white.
The 'sharpii' subspecies has darker colored stems in comparison to the other subspecies that are 0.8 to 2.8 inches thick with 11 to 17 ribs and 7 to 14 spines per areole. The flowers are magenta to white.
The 'weinbergii' subspecies has stems that are 2.4 to 5.1 inches thick with 14 or 15 ribs and 8 to 11 spines per areole. The pink diurnal flower petals are narrowly acute in shape.
T. read more he 'amoenus' variety has 5 inch wide stems, 10 to 14 ribs & on the young areoles it has 6 to 8 short spines with the lower spine being the longest. The older areoles are devoid of spines. The flowers are magenta.


Echinocereus pulchellus - garden

Origin and Habitat: Mexico (northern Oaxaca, Puebla, Hidalgo, San Luis Potosi, and Queretaro)
Ecology: It is a geophyte cactus with a swollen underground storage taproot, in the wild tends to disappear completely in the ground in time of drought.

  • Echinocereus pulchellus (Mart.) C.F.Först. ex F.Seitz
    • Cereus pulchellus Pfeiff.
    • Echinocactus pulchellus Mart.
    • Echinonyctanthus pulchellus Lem.
    • Echinopsis pulchella Zucc. ex Förster

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echinocereus pulchellus (Mart.) C.F.Först. ex F.Seitz
Nova Acta Phys.-Med. Acad. Caes. Leop.-Carol. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 342, t. 23, f. 2. 1832
Synonymy: 17

  • Echinocereus pulchellus (Mart.) C.F.Först. ex F.Seitz
    • Cereus pulchellus Pfeiff.
    • Echinocactus pulchellus Mart.
    • Echinonyctanthus pulchellus Lem.
    • Echinopsis pulchella Zucc. ex Förster
  • Echinocereus aguirrei Glass
    • Echinocereus amoenus var. aguirre hort.
    • Echinocereus pulchellus var. amoenus f. aguirrei (Glass)
  • Echinocereus pulchellus var. amoenus (A.Dietr.) H.P.Kelsey & Dayton
    • Cereus amoenus (A.Dietr.) Hemsl.
    • Echinocereus amoenus (A.Dietr.) K.Schum.
    • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. amoenus (A.Dietr.) W.Blum
    • Echinopsis amoena A.Dietr.
    • Echinopsis pulchella var. amoena (A.Dietr.) Förster
    • Echinopsis pulchella var. flore kermesina Haage ex Förster
    • Echinopsis pulchella var. rosea Labour.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. venustus W.Blum & W.Rischer
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echinocereus pulchellus subs. acanthosetus (S.Arias & U.Guzmán) N.P.Taylor
Cactaceae Consensus Init. 5: 12. 1998 [see also: W.Blum in W. Blum et al., Echinocereus (preprint) [8] (1998)]
Synonymy: 2
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. acanthosetus (S.Arias & U.Guzmán) N.P.Taylor
    • Echinocereus pulchellus var. acanthosetus S.Arias & U.Guzmán
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echinocereus pulchellus f. cristatus

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echinocereus pulchellus subs. sharpii (N.P.Taylor) N.P.Taylor
Cactaceae Consensus Init. 3: 9. 1997
Synonymy: 2

  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. sharpii (N.P.Taylor) N.P.Taylor
    • Echinocereus pulchellus var. sharpii N.P.Taylor
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echinocereus pulchellus subs. weinbergii (Weing.) N.P.Taylor
Cactaceae Consensus Init. 3: 9. 1997
Synonymy: 3
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. weinbergii (Weing.) N.P.Taylor
    • Echinocereus pulchellus var. weinbergii (Weing.) N.P.Taylor
    • Echinocereus weinbergii Weing.

Description: Echinocereus pulchellus ranges over almost 1600 km from north to south down the backbone of Mexico, and many forms and subspecies are recognized.
Habit: It is a tiny flat species that offsets sparingly, if at all.
Stems: Hemispherical, only 2-4 cm in diameter with short tubercles. The tubercles are arranged in ribs, sometimes subtly spiraled.
Spines: Inconspicuous in clusters of 3–7 spines.
Flowers: At the top of stems, showy, pinkish-white to hot-pink up to 4 cm across.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echinocereus pulchellus group

  • Echinocereus aguirrei" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8598/Echinocereus_aguirrei'> Echinocereus aguirrei Glass : Small Clumper that produces great pink flower (same as: Echinocereus pulchellus var. amoenus?).
  • Echinocereus pulchellus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8588/Echinocereus_pulchellus'> Echinocereus pulchellus (Mart.) C.F.Först. ex F.Seitz : (subsp. pulchellus) has stems that are 2,5-5 cm thick with 9 to 12 ribs and 3 to 7 inconspicuous spines per areole. The flowers are pink or white. Distribution: Oaxaca, Puebla, Hidalgo, and Queretaro.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. acanthosetus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/12905/Echinocereus_pulchellus_subs._acanthosetus'> Echinocereus pulchellus subs. acanthosetus (S.Arias & U.Guzmán) N.P.Taylor : has stems that are 2 to 4cm thick with 9 ribs usually and 5 to 8 flailing hairlike spines. The flowers are magenta to white. Distribution: Oaxaca.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus var. amoenus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8597/Echinocereus_pulchellus_var._amoenus'> Echinocereus pulchellus var. amoenus (A.Dietr.) H.P.Kelsey & Dayton : It has 15 cm stems, 10 to 14 ribs and on the young areoles it has 6 to 8 short spines with the lower spine being the longest. The older areoles are devoid of spines. The flowers are magenta.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus f. cristatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/12899/Echinocereus_pulchellus_f._cristatus'> Echinocereus pulchellus f. cristatus : It is a nice crestes form with bluish green stems.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. sharpii" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/12903/Echinocereus_pulchellus_subs._sharpii'> Echinocereus pulchellus subs. sharpii (N.P.Taylor) N.P.Taylor : It has darker colored stems in comparison to the other subspecies. Bodies 2 to 6 cm thick with 11 to 17 ribs and 7 to 14 spines per areole. The flowers are magenta or more often white. Distribution: Nuevo Leon and San Luis Potosi.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. venustus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/12907/Echinocereus_pulchellus_subs._venustus'> Echinocereus pulchellus subs. venustus W.Blum & W.Rischer : has low greyish-green body and pink flowers from the lower part of the body. Flower up to 30 mm long and 50-55 mm across. Distribution: San Luis Potosi City to Aguascalientes.
  • Echinocereus pulchellus subs. weinbergii" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/12900/Echinocereus_pulchellus_subs._weinbergii'> Echinocereus pulchellus subs. weinbergii (Weing.) N.P.Taylor : It has stems that are 5 to 15 cm thick with 14 or 15 ribs and 8 to 11 spines per areole. It has pink diurnal flower. The petals are narrowly acute in shape. Distribution: Zacatecas.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Edward Anderson “The Cactus family” Timber Press, Incorporated, 2001
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey "The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass" Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug/2011
3) David R Hunt Nigel P Taylor Graham Charles International Cactaceae Systematics Group. "The New Cactus Lexicon" dh books, 2006
4) Nathaniel Lord Britton, Joseph Nelson Rose “Cactaceae: Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family” Volume 3, 1922


Echinocereus pulchellus Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echinocereus pulchellus Photo by: Andrea B.
Echinocereus pulchellus Photo by: Andrea B.

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Cultivation and Propagation: It is relatively easy to grow on its own roots.
Growth rate: It is a relatively slow growing and easily flowering species that will make clumps given the best conditions.
Soils: It likes very porous standard cactus mix soil.
Repotting: It has a strong tap root and should have a deep pot to accommodate it. Use pot with good drainage.
Watering: Water carefully, too much water will make it rot, keep dry in winter.
Fertilization: Feed with a high potassium fertilizer in summer.
Hardiness: Keep dry at minimum temperature of 5° C in winter although will tolerate brief periods to -10 degrees. Sun Exposure: Full sun to light shade. However warmth throughout the year will increase the grower's success (5-12°C during rest season).
Exposition: Outside full sun to light shade or afternoon shade, inside it needs bright light, and some direct sun. Subject to sunburn if exposed to direct sun for too long. Tends to bronze in strong light, which encourages flowering.
Uses: It is an excellent plant for container growing. It always looks good and stays small. It look fine in a cold greenhouse and frame or outdoor in a rockery.
Pests & diseases: It may be attractive to a variety of insects, but plants in good condition should be nearly pest-free, particularly if they are grown in a mineral potting-mix, with good exposure and ventilation. Nonetheless, there are several pests to watch for:
- Red spiders: Red spiders may be effectively rubbed up by watering the plants from above.
- Mealy bugs: Mealy bugs occasionally develop aerial into the new growth among the wool with disfiguring results, but the worst types develop underground on the roots and are invisible except by their effects.
- Scales: Scales are rarely a problem.
- Rot: Rot is only a minor problem with cacti if the plants are watered and “aired” correctly. If they are not, fungicides won't help all that much.
Propagation: It grow easily from seed or cutting (if available).


Watch the video: 다육이선인장 작지만 큰매력 명석환!Echinocereus pulchellus