Red October Tomato Care – How To Grow A Red October Tomato Plant

Red October Tomato Care – How To Grow A Red October Tomato Plant

By: Mary Ellen Ellis

Growing tomatoes means a late summer, early fall treat in your garden. Nothing at the supermarket can compare to the freshness and taste you get from homegrown tomatoes. There are many varieties you can grow, but if you want a tasty tomato that will keep well, try the Red October.

What is a Red October Tomato?

Red October is a variety of tomato plant that produces large, about half-pound, fruits that store well and have a long shelf life. If you love tomatoes, you can design your garden to produce different varieties that ripen early, mid-season, and late. For those late tomatoes, you want fruit that will store well and keep well into late fall or early winter, depending on where you live.

Growing Red October tomatoes is a good option for your late-season, keeper tomatoes. They ripen in the fall but will keep up to four weeks longer than other varieties, even without being refrigerated. They will even keep a while on the vine; just harvest before the first serious frost.

How to Grow a Red October Tomato Plant

As with other types of tomatoes, choose a sunny spot for your Red October plants. Space them about 24 to 36 inches (60 to 90 cm.) apart to allow for growth and air flow. They should be transplanted outdoors sometime in May for most climates. Make sure the soil is rich or amended with organic material and that it drains well.

Once transplanted to the garden, Red October tomato care is similar to care for other varieties of tomato: control weeds, use mulch for weed control and water retention, and make sure the plants get one to two inches (2.5-5 cm.) of rain per week or additional water if needed. Avoid overhead watering to prevent disease.

Your Red October plants will give you a heavy harvest all at once late in the season. You can hold off harvesting some of your tomatoes as long as they are not vulnerable to pests or frost. Make sure you get them all in before the frost, though, even those that are not yet ripe. You’ll be able to enjoy fresh tomatoes for several more weeks, maybe even at Thanksgiving, thanks to the storage life of Red October.

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Enjoy Fresh Tomatoes All Year

Every day is a good day to eat homegrown tomatoes, so why not do all you can to make the dream of year-round fresh tomatoes come true? It’s easy to get a head start in spring if you use the right varieties and a few tricks. Then once the summer planting peaks, you can switch your attention to growing a fall crop that will finish ripening indoors after the first freeze. Plenty of light can keep a container-grown cherry tomato producing indoors through winter, which brings you back to spring.

Ready to get started? We’ll walk through the five basic steps with help from folks who share your passion for homegrown tomatoes.


List of Indeterminate Tomatoes from A to Z

What’s an indeterminate tomato, and why would you want a list of them? You can read our guide to tomato terminology here if you want to learn all the terms.

Indeterminate tomatoes, also known as cordon tomatoes or vine tomatoes, continue to grow and produce fruit throughout the summer. Because of this, they either require staking for support, or you can leave them to lie on the ground. They keep growing and get bigger and bigger as time goes on. They keep making tomatoes over time, so you can keep picking them over an extended period.

Determinate tomatoes, also known as bush tomatoes, are the other type not listed here. Bush tomatoes are bred to grow to a compact height, generally not more than four feet. They stop growing when the reach a certain height, normally not more than four feet. They also crop very quickly, with all of the fruit maturing over a period of a month or two. You get all your tomatoes in a short time period and then the plant is done.

So if you have room in your garden for bigger plants and you want tomatoes over a longer period of time, then you’ll be interested in this list or cordon tomatoes / indeterminate / vine!

A

The indeterminate tomatoes come from Germany. They are characterized by fruits with few seeds.

The tomatoes are indeterminate. They take up to 70 days to mature and at the moment, they are popular across the UK.

The cherry tomatoes come with a golden color. Their indeterminate profile allows them to be produced commercially.

The indeterminate red tomatoes have the shape of grapes. They are ripe in mid-season.

The indeterminate heirloom tomatoes are known for their juicy flesh. They are used for sauces and fresh eating.

These bi-color tomatoes have an indeterminate profile. The yellow-red tomatoes come with fruit sizes of 16oz.

With rich pink color, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for sandwiches and salads. They resist cracking.

With a distinct green look, the indeterminate tomatoes take at least 80 days to mature. They were first introduced in 1993 in Wisconsin.

With a rich flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes are meaty. They are suited to warmer climates.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet taste. Their fruits can grow up to 1 pound.

The indeterminate tomatoes are made for hot and humid climates. The tomatoes have disease resistance.

The green indeterminate tomatoes are sweet. The beefsteaks also have a yellow tint.

As their name suggests, the indeterminate tomatoes come are shaped like pears. They are known to be very productive.

The indeterminate tomatoes come from Russia. When they are ripe, they have a pale orange color.

B

Dating back hundreds of years, the indeterminate cherry tomatoes have a sweet taste. The tomatoes originate in Germany.

Based on midseason production until frost, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for most climates. They have good disease resistance.

The indeterminate cherry tomatoes grow to a plant height of 8 feet. The maximum fruit size is 1”.

With a firm profile, the large indeterminate tomatoes can be used for sandwiches. They can reach weights between 10 and 12 oz.

With a dark red color, the indeterminate tomatoes were first introduced in the US. They are suitable for slicing.

The indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing. They weigh 15 ounces per piece and are known for the long harvest.

The indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for sauces. Their size varies from 3” to 5” for the plum-shaped fruits.

With a light pink color, the indeterminate tomatoes come in medium sizes at 8-10oz. They are suitable for slicing.

The indeterminate beefsteak tomatoes have a mildly sweet flavor. They have a distinct red-green color.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. The plant’s height can reach 7 feet.

The indeterminate tomatoes produce 11/2” tomatoes until fall. They have a red color with purple-black overlays.

The bright red indeterminate tomatoes have a rounded shape. They grow on 5-feet plants.

With a beefsteak profile, the indeterminate tomatoes have a deep pink-red color. The fruit size can reach 16oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a pink color. They have a tangy flavor.

The yellow and red indeterminate tomatoes have low acidity. They are shaded by large leaves.

The indeterminate vines are suitable for sandwich tomatoes. The fruits have a deep red color.

The pink indeterminate tomatoes have a better growth habit than their heirloom counterparts. The fruits can reach up to 5” across.

The indeterminate pink beefsteaks reach up to 10oz. The plant’s height is 6 feet.

The indeterminate tomatoes are small at 4 inches. The hollow interior makes them look similar to peppers.

With a rich flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes can be traced back to 1949. They can reach weights of up to 10 oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes mature in 62 days. With solid flesh, the tomatoes grow all summer.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a meaty texture. The tomatoes can reach a weight of up to 2lbs.

The meaty indeterminate tomatoes are rich in taste. The fruits are large and suitable for slicing.

The indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 14 ounces. They were exported from Ukraine by Marina Danilenko.

The indeterminate tomatoes ripen through the season. They can take up to 75 days to reach maturity.

Bearing the name of the Crimean Peninsula, the indeterminate tomatoes reach maturity within 80 days.

Black Plum indeterminate tomatoes come from Russia’s Marina Danilenko. They can be used for a rich pasta sauce.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a red-black color. They are known for their juicy profile.

Known as Japanese or Russian Black Trifele, the indeterminate tomatoes take between 70 and 80 days to mature.

The 1-in yellow indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. They come from Germany.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known for their rich crops. The fruits have a rich flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes were first introduced in 1983 in Indiana. They are known for their bright yellow color.

These tomatoes are known for the size. They can reach a weight of up to 4lbs. The indeterminate tomatoes are common in the US.

The indeterminate tomatoes take up to 85 days to mature. They have a distinct yellow look with red swirls.

The indeterminate Bonny Best produces fruits of up to 8 ounces. The fruits are suitable for all purposes.

The red indeterminate tomatoes come in weights of up to 16 ounces. The color of the fruits is red with dark undertones.

The indeterminate tomatoes were first introduced in 1889. They were offered to Johnson and Stokes by a customer in Ohio.

With a pink color, the indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. They are not heavy producers.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a distinct yellow color. The fruits weight from 12 ounces to 2 pounds.

Popularly called Pink Brandywine, the tomatoes are rich in flavor. Their indeterminate fruits ripen through the season.

C

With red flesh, the indeterminate tomatoes are resistant to viruses. They are made to resist the Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

With a flavorful profile, the indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 8 ounces. Their rich taste recommends them for fresh eating.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a distinct bright orange color. They are used in soups and sauces.

With a distinct green color, the juicy indeterminate tomatoes are best served fresh.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a brownish red color. The tomatoes have regular leaves.

The indeterminate tomatoes are great fresh or dried. They are considered very productive.

The large and juicy indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for cooking. They can be sliced for sandwiches or added to salads.

Adapted from the Amana Orange, the indeterminate tomatoes resist cracking. They can be used in cooking as they maintain the distinct tangerine color throughout.

With red-black color, the indeterminate tomatoes are ripe late in the season. They are suitable for slicing.

With a dark red color, the indeterminate tomatoes grow in clusters. The plant height reaches 6 feet.

Growing in clusters, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for fresh eating. They have a sweet tangy flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a small 0.5oz size. The tomatoes are suitable for salads.

The 1” indeterminate tomatoes are known for their high nutritional value. The small tomatoes are high in Vitamin C.

The 1-inch indeterminate tomatoes have a red color. They are suitable for salads and decoration.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes have a deep pink color. The fruit size varies between 1 and 2 lbs.

The indeterminate red tomatoes resist viruses. Their 8oz fruits grow in clusters.

With an orange color with red stripes, the indeterminate tomatoes have a distinct look. They originate in the US.

Originating in Italy, the indeterminate tomatoes have a slight tart flavor. Their color is bright red.

The indeterminate Crimson Cushion takes 95 days to mature. The fruits can reach up to 2 pounds in weight.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a delicious flavor. They were introduced to the US by Yasha Crnkovic.

The 0.5oz cherry tomatoes resist viruses. The indeterminate plant can reach 5 feet in height.

Rich in production, the indeterminate tomatoes can measure up to 4 inches.

D

With fruit size of up to 7oz, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing. They have vivid red color.

The tomatoes fruits come in variable shapes. The indeterminate tomatoes grow in clusters of 7 fruits.

The red indeterminate tomatoes come with a ribbed texture. They have juicy flesh.

The tomatoes are believed to come from Germany. The indeterminate tomatoes grow pink fruits of up to 1lbs.

Going back to the 1930s, the indeterminate yellow tomatoes have a mild taste. They are suitable for slicing.

With a yellow-orange color, the indeterminate tomatoes can be traced back to 1929.

With high acidity, the indeterminate tomatoes are also high in sugar. They are suitable for slicing and sauces.

Originating in Bulgaria, the indeterminate tomatoes have a bright red color. They have a robust tomato flavor.

With a distinct golden color, the indeterminate tomatoes have a meaty flesh.

Growing up to 3 pounds, the indeterminate tomatoes have a mild flavor. They can be traced back to 1920.

E

Taking 59 days to mature, the indeterminate tomatoes have a slightly flattened shape. They have a meaty texture.

Introduced in New Jersey in 1900, the indeterminate tomatoes grow come in clusters of 4-5 ounce fruits.

With a fruit size of 3oz, the small tomatoes have a plum shape. The indeterminate tomatoes are Nematodes-resistant.

The indeterminate tomatoes originate in the Elbe River’s area in Germany. They come with a sweet and tart flavor.

Believed to come from Germany, these indeterminate tomatoes are recommended for humid areas. They have a distinct vivid red color.

The round indeterminate tomatoes have a fruit size of 8oz. The fruit shape is round and suitable for fresh consumption.

F

With a rounded shape, the indeterminate tomatoes have a size between 3 and 4oz. They have a deep red color.

The cherry tomatoes have a fruit size of 0.6oz. They indeterminate tomatoes have normal leave sizes.

With blight resistance, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for fresh eating. They grow on 6-feet plants.

With fruits of up to 7 inches, the indeterminate tomatoes can easily be processed. They can be the base for salsa sauces.

The pointed tomatoes are available early in the season. The indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 6oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes grow between 5 and 7oz. They have a rich flavor suitable for fresh consumption.

With a fruit size of up to 12oz, the indeterminate tomatoes resist Fusarium and Nematodes viruses.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with cherry-sized fruits. Ther are easy to recognize due to their deep red color.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with fruit sizes of up to 1oz. They are suitable for salads.

Up to 90 days is needed for the tomatoes to reach maturity. The indeterminate tomatoes have been developed in 1894.

With a green color, the indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 6oz. They abound late in the season.

With fruit sizes up to 0.6oz, the indeterminate tomatoes have a deep red color. They grow in clusters on 6-feet plants.

G

The specialty indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for fresh consumption. The fruits grow up to 3.4oz.

These 0.25oz indeterminate tomatoes are very suitable for salads and decoration. They originate in Germany.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a size of up to 8oz. The fruits have a red color.

The juicy indeterminate 2lbs fruits grow on 7-feet plants. They have a sweet flavor.

The beefsteak tomatoes grow fruits up to 16oz. The indeterminate tomatoes are perfect for fresh consumption.

The tomatoes come in a yellow color. They are indeterminate and distinctly fuzzy, as their name suggests.

With a slightly flattened shape, the tomatoes grow up to 10oz. The indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 4 feet.

Growing in clusters, the cherry tomatoes originate in China. They indeterminate fruits have an orange color.

The indeterminate tomatoes take up to 65 days to mature.

The meaty fruits of the tomato can grow up to 2 pounds. The indeterminate tomatoes take up to 85 days to mature.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with low acidity. The fruits have a pink color.

The indeterminate German heirloom has a strawberry color. They come with a rich flavor.

With larger orange-yellow fruits, the indeterminate tomatoes are known for their large size and good flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a meaty profile. The fruits can reach up to 2 pounds in weight.

The meaty tomatoes are flavorful. The indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for salads and sandwiches.

With up to 80 days needed to reach maturity, the indeterminate tomatoes offer hundreds of fruits per plant.

The plum-shaped indeterminate tomatoes have small 0.4oz fruits. They have a distinct orange color.

The indeterminate ribbed tomatoes come in sizes from 8 to 16 ounces. They have an old-fashioned taste.

The average flavor tomatoes are indeterminate. They are average in flavor intensity.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known to be very productive. They were first bred in 1983 by Thomas Wagner.’

The indeterminate tomatoes have a distinct olive yellow color. The fruit ripens within 2 weeks.

With a sweet flavor, the golden orange-golden indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for salads. They are also used for decoration.

The indeterminate cherry tomatoes have a size of up to 3/4in per fruit. The fruits have a golden color. The tomato plant can reach 8 feet in height.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes can be consumed fresh or canned. The fruits grow up to 12oz.

The distinctly green indeterminate tomatoes come with firm flesh. They feature a sweet-tart flavor.

The green indeterminate tomatoes are consumed fresh. They have distinct narrow leaves.

The indeterminate pointed tomatoes come in 0.7oz sizes. They are consumed fresh or added to salads.

The indeterminate small tomatoes have a 0.5oz size. Their flavor profile is sweet.

The tomatoes have dense flesh. With an indeterminate profile, they have a tangy flavor.

With a mildly sweet taste, the yellow indeterminate tomatoes can be used for cooking. The fruits grow through the season.

H

The red indeterminate tomatoes grow to 0.8oz. The plants can reach 8 feet in height.

Adapted for outside use, the indeterminate tomatoes grow to 8oz. They originate in the US.

The sweet tomatoes have a rich flavor. With an indeterminate profile, they are suitable for slicing.

The American indeterminate tomatoes have small plants. The fruits have a distinct golden color.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing and salads. The flavor profile is sweet.

With a bright yellow color, the indeterminate tomatoes grow in fruits of 2”. They have a sparkling flavor.

With a mildly sweet profile, the indeterminate tomatoes come from a seed company in Indianapolis. They are used in salads.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes are known for their pineapple resemblance. The tomatoes are mildly sweet.

The large beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes can reach weights of up to 2 pounds. They have a yellow-orange color.

With yellow and red, the tomatoes look distinctly juicy. The tomatoes are indeterminate, originating from Ohio.

The indeterminate tomatoes resist cracking. They originate from a village near Budapest.

I

Growing in clusters, the indeterminate tomatoes reach fruit sizes of 0.5oz. They are suitable for salads and decoration.

The yellow indeterminate tomatoes ripen through the season. They are rich in flavor with moderate acidity.

The red tomatoes come with a sweet flavor. These indeterminate tomatoes take between 70 to 80 days to ripe.

The indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 1lbs. They are suitable for slicing and sandwiches.

The Italian indeterminate heirlooms have a meaty flesh. They are suitable for sandwiches or served fresh.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet taste. The fruits ripen to ivory white and are suitable for fresh eating and decoration.

J

With distinct potato leaves, the indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. They are often canned.

Great for drying or roasting, the indeterminate tomatoes are known for their deep orange color. They come from France.

The red indeterminate tomatoes have a 3/4oz size. They grow on 6-feet tall plants.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet-sour taste. They make 8oz fruits.

With low acidity, the indeterminate tomatoes can be consumed fresh. Their sliceable fruits grow up to 10oz.

The pointed indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. Their plants reach up to 5 feet.

The indeterminate orange tomatoes come with a yellow tint. They are suitable for slicing.

The plum-shaped tomatoes are indeterminate. They are among the most resistant cherry tomatoes.

Rich in flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes are eaten fresh. The tomatoes were introduced in 1914.

The indeterminate heirloom tomatoes were released in 1943 by the Burpee Seed Company.

K

Probably originating from Germany, the indeterminate tomatoes have red beefsteak fruits which can grow up to 1.5 pounds. Double fruit is common with the low acidity tomatoes.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a distinct orange glowing color. They can take up to 90 days to mature.

The indeterminate tomatoes can be consumed fresh and sliced. Their fruits reach 10oz.

With an oval shape, the indeterminate tomatoes have a meaty flesh. They are recognized due to their distinct orange color.

Originating in the Kolb Greenhouse of Storm Lake, the indeterminate tomatoes have a pink color. They are rich in flavor.

L

The cherry indeterminate tomatoes come with a deep red color. With sizes up to 1”, they are rich producers.

These tomatoes are very productive. With fruits between 1 and 2 inches, the indeterminate tomatoes are used in salads or eaten fresh.

With a transparent yellow-green color, the tomatoes are indeterminate. They are known for their resilience in cold and wet weather.

These potato leaf indeterminate tomatoes were first collected by Lillian Bruce in Tennessee.

These red tomatoes have an indeterminate growth habit. They are named after Alexander Livingston’s seed trade.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes have a rich taste, suitable for fresh eating. They reach 10oz per fruit.

M

With a distinct pink look with yellow stripes, the indeterminate tomatoes are consumed fresh. The fruit size can reach up to 1”.

The indeterminate tomatoes originate in France. The 10oz fruits are rich in flavor and not prone to cracking.

With meaty fruits, the indeterminate tomatoes are plum-shaped. The tomatoes reach up to 6 feet in height.

The yellow indeterminate tomatoes grow in clusters of 3 to 5. Their fruits can reach 10oz.

These pink tomatoes are indeterminate. They are sweet in flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes are resistant to disease. They come in a dark red color.

Similar to beefsteaks but smaller in size, the indeterminate tomatoes can grow up to 2oz.

With dark green and ribbed shoulders, the indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 8oz.

With a sweet flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes are grape-sized. Their fruits reach up to 1oz.

Smaller than regular indeterminate cherry tomatoes, Matt’s Wild Cherry come from Mexico’s wild tomatoes.

These indeterminate orange tomatoes also feature distinct orange stripes. They have juicy flesh.

Bering very productive, the indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. Their size varies between ½-¾ inches.

The indeterminate smooth tomatoes grow in clusters of 4 to 6. The tomatoes have a rich flavor.

As their name suggests, the tomatoes come in a pink color. The indeterminate tomatoes have a juicy profile.

With inexpensive seeds, the indeterminate tomatoes take 80 days to mature.

With a bright orange color, the indeterminate tomatoes ripen through the season. They have a distinctly-solid flesh.

These beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes used to pay off a mortgage.

These indeterminate tomatoes have a rich taste and slightly flattened shape. They are suitable for cold climates.

The indeterminate tomatoes grow up to 1lbs. They come with high sugar content and with a yellow color with red stripes.

The red indeterminate tomatoes resist drought. They are also disease-resistant.

N

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. They are in the category of grape-sized tomatoes as their fruits grow to 1”.

These indeterminate tomatoes ripen over a two-week period. They can be traced back to 1983.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known for their shiny look. The fruits grow up to 6oz.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. Their fruits grow large, up to 16oz per piece.

Free from blemishes, the indeterminate tomatoes have a brown-red color. They are very productive.

O

The indeterminate red and yellow tomatoes come with few seeds. The color of the skin is also visible in the flesh of the tomatoes.

The indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for hot climates. They come with thick skin which resists cracking.

The red junior beefsteaks are indeterminate. Their flavor profile is sweet and acidic.

The shiny red indeterminate tomatoes are easy to recognize. Their fruits reach 3.3-1/2oz.

With a distinct orange color, the indeterminate tomatoes have fruits of up to 6oz. They are plum-shaped.

The indeterminate beefsteaks have a rich sweet flavor. The fruits reach up to 2 pounds.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes have a dark orange color. They grow up to 12 oz per fruit.

The orange indeterminate beefsteaks are suitable for slicing. The tomatoes grow to 16oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes are resistant to Verticillium and Fusarium. They have an orange look with a firm texture.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes come with vigorous plants. The fruits are firm and juicy ready to pick in 75 days.

The indeterminate vines are recommended for early growth. The fruits come with a low number of seeds.

Growing between 3 and 6 inches, the fruits of the tomatoes have few seeds. The indeterminate tomatoes hold well on the vine.

P

With an elongated shape, the indeterminate tomatoes can be used for cooking as they come with just a few seeds. Grows as an indeterminate bush and suitable for containers.

With a distinct red color, the virus-resistant indeterminate tomatoes grow abundant crops. Their fruits have a size of 7oz.

With an irregular shape, the indeterminate tomatoes have vivid red color. The tomatoes reach up to 10oz in weight.

At 3oz, the indeterminate tomatoes have the size of a ping pong ball. The tomatoes are suitable for salads.

With a deep pink flesh, the indeterminate tomatoes can reach up to 14oz. They are used in sandwiches.

With a rich flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes take 80 days to mature.

With a dark red to black color, the indeterminate tomatoes mature in 90 days. They come from Russia.

With a pink look and a fuzzy skin, the indeterminate tomatoes have a refreshingly sweet flavor.

Originating in Russia, the orange tomatoes can reach 1lbs in weight. The indeterminate tomatoes are blemish-free.

Traced back to the 1890’s France, the indeterminate vines produce until frost. They have a meaty texture.

The yellow skin with red streaks is what inspired the names of these indeterminate tomatoes. They come in large sizes.

The 16oz indeterminate tomatoes come with a rich flavor. They have a distinct light pink color.

These distinct indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing. They come in a light pink color.

The indeterminate vines are known for their 1-2 pound size. They come with a firm texture.

The indeterminate tomatoes look similarly to lemons. Their taste is mild-citrusy.

The ribbed indeterminate tomatoes come with a 1-pound weight. The tomatoes have a rich flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes can be traced to 1891. They usually come in sizes between 1 and 2 pounds.

With rich red color, the indeterminate tomatoes are crack-resistant. They are suitable for canning.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known for their size. With weights between 2 and 4lbs, the fruits are large and juicy.

The indeterminate tomatoes are rich in carotenoids. They mature in just 45 days.

With a dark pink-purple color, the indeterminate tomatoes are rich in taste. They have firm flesh.

With a dark marooned color, the indeterminate tomatoes have a complex flavor. They grow in crops of 3-inch tomatoes.

The red indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. They are distinctly pear-shaped.

Probably originating in Mexico, the indeterminate tomatoes come with a translucent yellow color. They are very productive.

Q

The red long indeterminate tomatoes come in fruits of 5oz. The tomato plant has a height of 8 feet.

With a bright red color, the indeterminate tomatoes produced in clusters of 4. The tomatoes are used for slicing.

R

Consumed fresh, the soft indeterminate tomatoes can be sliced for sandwiches. The fruits reach up to 12oz.

The miniature tomatoes take at least 65 days to mature. Their indeterminate profile also comes with regular leaves.

The indeterminate tomatoes originate in Florida. They are characterized by productive plants.

The grape-sized tomatoes have an indeterminate profile. The fruits reach up to 0.75oz.

With a sweet flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes are best fresh. Their fruits grow to 1”.

These indeterminate tomatoes have a unique look. With a raspberry color, the large tomatoes are suitable for slicing.

The 1lbs indeterminate tomatoes come with distinct large leaves. The tomatoes are virus-resilient.

The indeterminate red tomatoes are fully ripe in fall. They are known for their extra weeks of resilience with no refrigeration.

With pear-shaped fruits, the indeterminate tomatoes originate in Philadelphia. They are suitable for drying.

The heart-shaped indeterminate tomatoes are recommended for slicing. They have a rich fruity taste.

Dating back to the 1700s, the indeterminate tomatoes can deal with early blight. Their fruits are distinctly blemish-free.

The indeterminate beefsteak tomatoes can be consumed fresh. They reach 10oz per fruit.

With a red skin color, the indeterminate tomatoes mature mid-season. They resist viruses.

With a ruffled look, the indeterminate cherry tomatoes have a size of 2oz. They grow on tall 7-feet plants.

With a red color and yellow stripes, the indeterminate tomatoes have a unique look. They are known for their sweet flavor as well.

Selected from Livingston’s Beauty, the indeterminate tomatoes have a pink color. The plant reaches 6 feet.

Suitable for hot climates, the indeterminate tomatoes have a red color. They make fruits of up to 8oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes are a cross between JTD and Marglobe. They are suitable for slicing.

The small ¼in indeterminate tomatoes come with a rich taste. They are consumed fresh.

Discovered on the fields of California, the indeterminate tomatoes come with a distinct red look with orange stripes.

Originating in Germany, the indeterminate tomatoes can bear fruits of up to 1in.

The indeterminate tomatoes have an Amish origin. They are rich in flavor.

S

The grape-shaped indeterminate tomatoes have a size of 0.6oz. They grow in clusters on 8-feet plants.

With a pink color, the plum-shaped indeterminate tomatoes are used in pasta. Their fruits vary between 4 and 6 inches.

With a sweet flavor, the indeterminate tomatoes are used for sauces. They have average productivity.

The semi-determinate tomatoes take 85 days to mature. Their seeds are available for purchase.

Originating from Greece’s Santorini, the indeterminate tomatoes are small by nature.

The grape-shaped indeterminate tomatoes can be consumed fresh. Their fruits reach 1”.

With a rich tomato flavor, the indeterminate plant grows to 4 feet producing 10oz fruits.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known for their resilience. They resist Nematodes and Mosaic viruses.

The beefsteak indeterminate tomatoes are consumed fresh. Their fruit size reaches 10oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet taste. Used in salads, the tomatoes are made to resist diseases.

Producing an early harvest, the indeterminate tomatoes are productive. The tomatoes have a deep red color.

Producing from mid-summer to early fall, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing. They have a juicy nature.

The indeterminate tomatoes are known for their smoky flavor. They produce clusters of 8-12 1” fruits.

The distinct indeterminate tomatoes have a red and yellow color. They have a refreshing tangy flavor.

The indeterminate tomatoes take 65 days to reach maturity. They have a sweet-tart flavor with a golden –orange look.

With a neon yellow color, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for slicing. They have moderate acidity.

The indeterminate red tomatoes come in large sizes. They are suitable for slicing. The tomatoes also resist Mosaic and Fusarium viruses.

Being larger then Early Girl, the indeterminate tomatoes reach weights of 5-6oz. They are known for their disease tolerance.

With a summer-long supply, the indeterminate tomatoes are used for juicy sauces. They are also suitable for slicing.

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a distinct golden color as they are high in carotene. They take 63 days to mature.

The indeterminate tomatoes have no seeds. They are solid, juicy and suitable for slicing and fresh eating.

The indeterminate vines are very productive. They are known for heavy crops and banana-like shape.

With a meaty texture, the indeterminate tomatoes come with weights of up to 1 pound. They can be grown in small gardens.

With high sugar and high acidity, the indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for purees and fresh consumption.

With a unique variety, the indeterminate tomatoes have very few seeds. The fruits grow to 10oz.

The pink indeterminate tomatoes are rich in flavor. Their fruits reach 1” on 5-feet plants.

The oval red-orange indeterminate tomatoes come from Germany’s Manheim family. The tomatoes resist cracking.

Growing up to 6 ounces, the indeterminate tomatoes originate in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. They are very productive.

The indeterminate tomatoes are believed to originate in Poland. They have thin skin susceptible to cracking.

The indeterminate tomatoes are red with orange stripes. The tomatoes are a cross between Antique Roman and Banana Legs.

Producing well in Northern climates, the indeterminate tomatoes are believed to originate from former Czechoslovakia.

The distinct red-yellow indeterminate tomatoes are made for slicing. They have a tart flavor.

With 62 days needed to reach maturity, the indeterminate tomatoes have distinct potato-type leaves.

Growing in clusters of 12 fruits, the indeterminate German tomatoes have a sweet taste. They are characterized by vivid red color.

The elongated Italian indeterminate tomatoes are used for sauces and canning. The fruits can reach weights of 10 ounces.

The globe-shaped indeterminate tomatoes are suitable for hot weather. They are used for canning or consumed fresh.

With high sugar content, the indeterminate tomatoes are sweet. The sweet tomatoes grow in clusters of up to 20.

With an indeterminate profile, they are used as a garnish. They are considered one of the best red currant tomatoes.

T

The red indeterminate tomatoes have a size of 0.5oz. Their grape-size is suitable for fresh consumption.

With a distinct tangerine shape, the indeterminate tomatoes have a tart-citrus flavor. The fruits grow up to 7 ounces.

The tomatoes have a green color. The indeterminate tomatoes are very sweet.

The Greek indeterminate tomatoes have medium acidity. They resist cracking and high temperatures.

The indeterminate tomatoes have red fruits with yellow stripes. The fruits reach 3oz.

The indeterminate tomatoes are easy to recognize. They have a long grape shape with points at the end.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. They stay on the vine for a long time and they are crack-resistant.

Being indeterminate, the cherry tomatoes are considered to be very productive. The plants are very vigorous.

These indeterminate tomatoes come with an interesting dual color combining orange and red. The 7oz fruits are resistant to disease.

The orange-red indeterminate tomatoes resist viruses. They reach 0.6oz.

Made to resist cracking, the indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor. Their large fruits can reach 1lbs.

With a heart shape, the indeterminate tomatoes come with a deep red color. Their juiciness is suitable for salads.

Taking 72 days to mature, the indeterminate tomatoes are juicy and flavorful. Their maximum weight is 6 ounces.

The indeterminate tomatoes have a round shape. Their size varies from 2 to 3”.

These round tomatoes can grow up to 7 ounces. The indeterminate tomatoes are used for slicing as a result.

Originating from Arkansas, the indeterminate tomatoes come with regular leaves.

The meaty indeterminate vines grow up to 25 feet. The fruits are used for slicing and canning.

The round indeterminate tomatoes come with a distinct red color. They were developed in Israel.

The 3” pink tomatoes are known for their strong flavor. The indeterminate tomatoes have good blight resistance.

U

The indeterminate tomatoes are resistant to cracking. They might also be available under the name of Purple Russian.

These indeterminate tomatoes reach weights between 6 and 8oz. Their vigorous plants are made to resist viruses.

With fruits growing all season, the indeterminate tomatoes have variegated coloration. The tomato fruits can reach a size of 2 inches in diameter.

These tomatoes are easy to recognize with due to the silvery-grey foliage. The indeterminate tomatoes can grow up to an inch.

With a pale-pink color, the indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet taste. They can be served fresh.

W

The indeterminate vines grow in heavy crops. The meat of the fruit is purple-red, similar to the flesh of a watermelon.

As most Peach tomatoes, Wapsipinicons have a fuzzy skin texture. These indeterminate tomatoes can be recognized due to their distinct yellow color.

These indeterminate tomatoes mature early. Their color is pale yellow to ivory.

With a distinct color combination of pale yellow and pink, the indeterminate tomatoes have a sweet flavor.

With high sugar content, the indeterminate vines are white when fully ripe. Fruits weigh up to 4 ounces each.

With deep ribbings, these indeterminate tomatoes grow fruits of up to 2 pounds.

With a distinct bright red color, the indeterminate tomatoes are seen on rich soils. They are used for canning.

Y

The indeterminate tomatoes come with a lemony-yellow color. With smaller seed cavities and lower acidity, they are used in salads and sandwiches.

Related

Comments

Bryan S Wayment says

On your list of indeterminate tomatoes, you don’t have Hamson (aka DX52-12).

Steve says

Also don’t have Parks Whopper, which is one of the best tasting tomatoes I’ve ever had.

Floyd Buyers says

This has to be one of the worst compilations of tomato information I’ve encountered (both the determinate AND indeterminate lists). The information is spotty, incredibly skimpy, inconsistent, with often meaningless descriptions. All total — between the two lists — there are over 400 varieties listed. The information is useless for any kind of planting decisions, and so incomplete that you will have to go elsewhere to get the kind of useful information you’ll need when deciding what to plant. It’s as if the author sat up late one night going through 5 or 6 catalogs from different vendors and cobbling together 2 or 3 sentences about each variety. Worst of all, the lists are missing many of the varieties that you’ll find at your local nursery, Home Depot, or Lowes, which is where many gardeners end up buying their seeds or seedlings.

For a website like “The Gardening Channel”, a lot more thought and research should have been put into this kind of document. This could have – and should have – been so much better.

Deb Jones says

Well, do you have a better list please. I would like to know more about what people call “vine tomatoes”. At my little garden centre I get a lot of requests for “vine tomatoes”, which I have learned are the indeterminate tomatoes, which means keeps on growing even after producing it’s first fruit. This is opposed to ‘bush” tomatoes, which stop growing in height when they reach their max height for the season.
if You could please list at least some of the vine tomatoes, I would appreciate it.
DJ

gardeningchannel says

Vine tomatoes are the same as indeterminate tomatoes. If you are selling seeds, the packages should say whether they are indeterminate or determinate.

Paul S Searcy says

There are only 3 on your list that are VFN resistant, Jet Star, Better Boy and Rampapo possibly a 4th, Rutgars, if Rutgars and Rutgars 39 are the same.

Jamie R says

I would like to say that the comment above was quite harsh. I found this article very informative. Great work to the publisher.

Cindy says

The heading above is exactly as listed….it is a list of Indeterminate tomatoes nothing further . I needed this so I knew what to prune and what not to prune. If you want more information on each plant find another site!!

Dave Jones says

Does anyone know of a red tomato with a green centre? I used to sell them on a market stall about 50 years ago but can’t remember their name. ( Not cherry)


These indeterminate tomatoes ripen about 90 days after planting. They are quite large—one to two pounds, with pink flesh and skin. Bull's Heart is an oxheart-shaped Russian variety. If you're a fan of more flesh and fewer seeds in your tomatoes, this would be a good one to try!

These beautiful tomatoes are red, but turn purplish-brown at the shoulders when ripe. The flavor is complex and slightly smoky—perfect eaten as-is or sliced into a salad. It's hard to predict exactly when this variety will produce, but it traditionally produces very well from late July through to frost.


Tomatoes For the High Desert

I'd like to get a thread going to discuss tomato varieties that do well—or not--in the high desert regions of the Southwest. I'm in Zone 8b at 4,760 feet (SE AZ). We're fairly dry, though we had good winter and summer rains last year, but we've had no rain since early-mid September. The coldest its been in our three winters of living here has been 22°F. Summer highs typically in the 90s, rarely over 100°F. It's VERY windy March through May/June. I grow tomatoes in 2 foot diameter cages, five feet high, made from concrete reinforcing mesh (six-inch square mesh) and I use drip irrigation. Other than losing a few plants to early curly top virus in 2009 (the lesson there is to get rid of wild growing London Rocket (a beet leaf hopper host)), I don't have any disease problems to speak of. Even hornworms haven't been an issue. My experiences over the last two summers:

Brandywine, various types—lovely, big plant, zero tomatoes. I want to grow them, but feel it's pointless in my climate. I hope someone can change my mind.
Stupica (2010 only)—Did well. Small tasty tomatoes, advertised as cold tolerant, but seems heat tolerant, too.
Celebrity—Does well. Lots of cracking in 2009. Mine tend to be small.
Early Girl—Does well. Mine tend to be small.
Giant Belgium—Did well in 2009, not in 2010 (2010 probably my fault). Beautiful, very big, tasty 'maters and good production.
Paul Robeson (2010 only)--Very lush plant, the foliage was so dense it looked like a brain (strange sounding but accurate description), zero tomatoes or flowers.
Wapsipinicon Peach—Small yellow, fuzzy tomatoes, very tasty although somewhat soft/mushy. Very productive.
Beam's Yellow Pear—Overly abundant and reliable, not the best tasting but fine in a salad or popped into your mouth right in the garden.
Gold Medal (2009 only)--Great big, tasty, beautiful tomatoes, low yield.
Sweet Pea Currant—Very productive and good tasting tiny tomato (a half inch or less in diameter). Plant sprawls all over mine were nearly eight feet across. Grew out of the cage rather than up it. Good for popping or salads.
Japanese Black Trifele (2009 only)--Productive, tasty. Mine tended to crack a lot.
Orange Fleshed Purple Smudge (2009 only)—Attractive tomato, reasonably productive, poor taste.
Tommy Toe—Large cherry type. Tasty and productive. One of my favorites.
Cherokee Purple—Great tomato, not very productive.
Black Krim—Not very productive, lots of cracking and deformity.
Burpee Tomande (2010 only)--Good production, big, red, tasty tomatoes
Burpee Red October—Smallish but tasty tomatoes, Good production.
Sun Gold—Small, tasty, very productive cherry type. Another favorite.
Henderson's Pink Ponderosa—Nice big tasty tomatoes, fair production.
Burpee 4th of July—Nice, tasty smallish tomato. Minimal cracking.

What I'm really hoping for is discussion of varieties, escpecially heirlooms, that are reasonably tolerant of high desert growing conditions, as well as recommendations of what's not worth growing. For me, the most promising candidates to date are Giant Belgium, Black Trifele, Pink Ponderosa, and Tomande (a hybrid) I hope we can get a lot of information gathered from folks in similar climates and zero in on the most promising varieties for the high desert. I'm posting this in both here and in the “Southwest Gardening” forum to attract a (hopefully) wider audience. Thanks for contributing!

Whoops, correct "Stupica" to read "Stupice". Also, feel free to weigh in with thoughts from anywhere with fairly hot, dry summers. I know that describes more than just the high deserts of the Southwest.

There have actually been threads about this topic you may want to look back. I'll try also and post links. You should get more responses after the Holiday.
Off the top of my head:
Mortgage Lifter
Cherokee Purple
Moneymaker
Arkansas Traveler
Limmony
Thai Pink Egg (produces like crazy)
Porter
Rutgers
Pearson
Homestead
Cream Sausage ( some people don't like them)

Willy, this year in Germany the first 3 weeks of July we had a taste of your weather with the temps hovering around 95 deg F. So I got a chance to see how the plants I was growing did in this heat. Al least 50% had no fruit set while others varied. Good news is there is a Brandywine that seems to do well in the heat and it's called "Cowlick's Pink Brandywine". I got good fruit set on my plant and good production. A friend also growing it who lives on the Alabama/Florida border said it was the only Brandywine he has grown that produced fruit in his climate. Here are some varieties that did well for me. Ami


Amazon Chocolate PL
Oleyar's German
Casady's Folly
Cowlick's Pink Brandywine
Krasnyi Mayak
Barlow Jap
Kolb Pink

And here are some varieties that performed well from the above mentioned individual on the Alabama/Florida border.

Stump of the World
Kosovo
Bill's Berkley Pink
Neves Azorean Red
Cabernet (hybrid)
JDs Special C Tex
Black Krim
Indian Stripe
Marianna's Peace
Cowlick's Pink Brandywine

I am interested to follow this thread. We are hot here but enjoy more humidity than those in the high desert so I don't have suggestions to contribute.

There are some interesting suggestions that I need to research

One variety that I've had recommended a couple of times is Purple Calabash. Have any of you had any experience with it in hot, dry climates?

I'm at 6500 feet in the upper Rio Grande Valley. Our winters are a lot colder and the season is shorter, but the summer is hot and generally dry. Especially the last couple of years, it was 90-100 in June. Anyway, if it hits 90 the pollen just clumps and the blossoms drop as you know. Cherry tomatoes tend to handle it better, but I stretch shade cloth over a lot of the plants. Just a couple of thoughts, then. I've had good luck with some of the Brandywine crosses like Chianti Rose. Black from Tula is one of the best blacks here, Bedouin is the very best, and we plant some other early blacks. Purple Calabash is not a tomato I'd grow again - didn't like the flavor. And you are right about Purple Smudge - worst tomato award for that one. Thessaloniki, Chapman and Wes are great reds. If you're going to grow a hybrid you might go for Jetsetter rather than Early Girl. Yellow Submarine puts all other yellow pears to shame. Lucky Cross is a huge bicolor, and I had several Orange Strawberry plants you had to climb a ladder to pick.
I try to keep track of all the varieties we've grown on a spreadsheet on our farm website, but everyone's experience is different. If you're curious about what we've tried, that's at jandlgardens.
You'll probably be starting seed pretty soon - good luck and let us know how it goes.

We are actually low desert (1000' elevation) here in Phoenix. Very hot and very dry.

I have had good luck with Phoenix (trialed plants sent from San Antonio last year and bought seeds for this year), Black Cherry, Sungold (though they are a little too sweet for my liking), Sun Sugar, Steak Sandwich, Dr. Carolyn (Pink and Yellow), Moskvich, Principe Borghese, Bloody Butcher, Large Pink Bulgarian and a couple of different Brandywine strains. There are more but that is what I can think of off the top of my head here at work - lol.

The key for us here is to get those seeds started mid-December to plant out around Valentine's Day. It's a gamble with a rare late frost, but any later and the long DTM heirlooms don't set fruit before the heat hits. Some folks fall plant them and get them through the winter or baby them through the summer. That is too much trouble for me sometimeso) We had a frost early last week and Bloody Butcher and Sun Sugar came through with just a few damaged leaves. I didn't cover anything.

what do you consider the optimum DTM for growing in your zone?

Hi pod! Best bet is something about 75 days. We never know when the heat will hito) But, I love all the old heirloom 90+ DTM goodies so need to improvise and get them in ground as soon as possible in the spring.

Still learning here. thanks! I remember reading a DTM recommendation but don't think I saved the info. Need to sharpen my pencil and calculate.
For me Valentines day would be just too early here. That is recommended potato planting time but the soil is still too cold for tomatoes.

Yeah, you're probably safe to shoot for mid-March and be prepared to cover if needed for a late frost. Good thing is the plants will be relatively small and easier to covero) I try to plant out a month before our projected last frost date which is mid-March. I've lived in AZ 18 years and never seen one that late yet!

Does anyone know where to get the Cowlick's Brandywine seed mentioned by Amideutch (above). If anyone has some for trade or sale, we could try to work something out. Hope everyone is enjoying the Holiday season--it's almost over.

For a few years, I was afraid to grow anything beyond Super Sioux, Homestead and Arkansas Traveler because I didn't think they would work for my area. Once I got over that, I learned that most paste, standard reds (i.e. old commercial canning varieties) and cherries are productive no matter what the vendor descriptions. I've tried close to a hundred different types of tomatoes and most do give a descent crop.

Don't worry about not getting a load of fruit from the heirloom beefsteaks (i.e. Brandywine, Cherokee Purple and Mortgage Lifter). They are notoriously tempermental. In a good year, there will be about 4 to 5 tomatoes per plant. As Locakelly mentioned, get them in the ground early. Ocassionally, there will be a few days here and there were the temperture is just right for them to set. Marvel Stripe is the only beefsteak that does well every year. Great White and Marianna's Peace did well in the past.

Flower size and structure is a good indicator of what may or may not work in hotter areas. Small flowers with a short or no visable style tend to do set under a wider range of temps. The large flowered - sometimes called old fashioned blossoms - with extra long styles often fail to set fruit when temps are about 85 degrees.

I actually have gotten tons of fruit off my plants this year, they are stilll going. However, every year is different. All I grow is O/Ps I'll list them later, when I have more time.

Willy, you can order them from Tatiana's at the link below. It's listed as Brandywine, Cowlick's. Ami

This message was edited Dec 31, 2010 10:52 AM

Amideutch--Thanks--seeds are already ordered!

1lisac--I look forward to your OP list. I bought a ham from Robertson's when I was in your neck of the woods about 15 years ago. Made the whole plane smell like smoke on the trip home!

I can't believe you brought a ham on a plane!

These are the tomatoes that did the best for me this year and they are still going because I have protected them from the freezing weather.
1) Thai Pink Egg-first year
2) Limmony-first year
3) Mortgage Lifter- Pink and Yellow ( always does great)
4) Black Krim-first year
5) Paul Robeson-My favorite
6) Black from Tula- first year
7) Porter-first year
8) Rutgers-first year
9) Cherokee Choc-first year
10) Hillbilly-great production
11) Big Rainbow-great production
12) Arkansas Traveler

All these did great but they were very late in producing.

Did you save any seed from the Hillbilly? I tried it this year, and I had absolutely NO tomatoes. Maybe I had a bad variant. I think I bought from Parks, with the Sweet Pickles pepper seeds. The vines were decent, but never set any fruit.

I did have good luck with Porter, Rutgers, and Arkansas Traveler among the tomatoes you list.

No David I didn't save any seeds. However, I can send you a few from the packet I have from Baker Creek. Just Dmail me. I need to order more anyway.
Mine produed late well they all did but this was really late.
Did yours bloom? I grew these plants in a location that I had never used before. The area has more shade which I think helped a lot.

Willy, I grow in Camp verde az., Over the years of growing tomatos in our region I found the best open pollinated tomato for our region to be the pearson A-1 improved. For hybrid go with Big Beef or Betterboys, both are bery easy plants to find. Google the pearson and you will find the seeds. I keep trying to get the boys out at bonnies to plant this old variety but no take yet! Was a very popular tomato in the phoenix area back in the 50's and 60's, this was the variety that the japanese farmers planted in the phoenix area years ago.

Lisa-the amount of sun may be the issue (with heat and dryness). All my tomatoes are in the garden patch, in FULL, all-day sun. Maybe I'll order Hillbilly from Baker Creek next year and give them a try. I'm ready to start the seeds I have now, so I can plant early!

Interesting reading this morning.

I haven't participated b'c I have no experience growing tomatoes at high and dry locations.

Low and humid OK, low and high temps and humid OK, and temperate during the season OK, but, not high and dry. ( smile)

I guess all I can say is that if a variety doesn't perform well in one season and it's one that others have had success with, grow it the next season. This past summer half of my plants had no fruits, so those varieties will be regrown this coming summer, with fingers crossed.

No two growing seasons are exactly the same, wherever anyone lives.

Carolyn, just wondering a bit about the above reference to Dr. Carolyn Yellow. I'm told that White Flower Farm was selling plants with that name, but the name that Steve Draper gave to that variety was just Dr. Carolyn. All so called white tomatoes ripen up to never white, but colors ranging from ivory to pale yellow to perhaps even a darker yellow. It all depends on the degree of foliage cover and the exposure to UV. The whitest and best tasting LARGE fruited variety that I've grown is White Queen which actually has some taste.

The problem with TX, at least in my area, is that it can be dry or humid. There is no way of knowing. I have finally decided to stick with the ones that I know will produce and add new ones here and there.

The Dr. Carolyn seeds I grew came from WinterSown.org. One was deep pink fruited with darker shoulders, the other a pale yellow.

Edited bacause I hit send before my brain was done - lol.

White Flower Farm does sell plants of Dr. Carolyn, the yellow (parent?) variety.

Tatiana's sells seeds of the pink, the parent and a green called Green Doctors (a green cherry sport of the variety Dr. Carolyn) .

This message was edited Jan 8, 2011 6:24 PM

Dr. Carolyn, ivory fruits to pale yellow. Yes I know White Flower Farm renamed it Dr. Carolyn Yellow which they shouldn't have done. it appears that they don't realize that there are NO totally white varieties although White Queen is the whitest and best tasting one one I've come across, not a cherry. The degree of so called whiteness is dependedn on the variety first, then the degree of Foliage cover and then the degree of UV exposure.In the past I've e-mailed WFF several times b'c they've had wrong info and wrong pictures of varieties.

So the seed you got from Trudi was cross pollinated as donated to her and she clearly says that she's not repsonsible for X pollinated, not true varieties.

In another thread here I just went through how the variety Dr. Carolyn came about as well as Dr. Carolyn pink as well as Dr. Carolyn mutating to Green Doctors and then Green Doctors mutating with an epidermis mutation to Green Doctors Frosted.

There were no parents involved as I just explained in the answer I wrote just a few minuetes ago all came from saved seeds of Galina. I'd go look for it but then I'd lose this post. LOL

yes, I know what's at Tania's site, less than 30 min ago she sent me her list of varieties she would like from my seed offer at Tville which I'm going to have to close soon b'c there's about 80 responses and that means packing about 400 seed packs, and well, enough is enough and besides I'm a tennis nut and the Australian Open starts in about a week. LOL But I'm glad to share with others some of the varieties I also SSE list and others that are brand new. Tania and I have been friends now for several years.

Carolyn, and hopefully someone here can point you to the post I refer to about the sequence of Dr. Carolyn to Green Doctors Frosted and how it all came about.

Thanks for the information Carolyn! I love reading your posts and learning from youo) There is a lot of misinformation out there and it's nice to have a source to come to and hear the real story. I like WinterSown as I get to try new varieties - I understand the no guarantee but have always had good luck with their seeds.

That's a lot of seed packs to pack - lol. I don't visit Tomatoville as much as I should. I ♥ seeing all the varieties and adding them to my list of 'maters I must grow. Now I need to find White Queen - lol.

I'll see if I can dig around and find the post unless someone beats me to it. Enjoy the Open. I loved watching tennis when I was a kid, Martina and Steffi, Connors and McEnroe. That probably gives you a clue that I'm fairly young with lots to learn stillo)

Edited to say I found it! The search here at DG is much more efficient these days.

This message was edited Jan 8, 2011 7:50 PM


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