Carob Problems - The expert answers on carob tree diseases

Carob Problems - The expert answers on carob tree diseases

THE AGRONOMIST ANSWERS ON HOW TO GROW AND CARE FOR PLANTS

CAROB PROBLEMS

Ceratonia siliqua(Family Fabaceae)

The section is dedicated to plant problems.If you wish to write to our agronomist in order to have an answer on an unclear situation or a difficulty concerning your plant, it is necessary that you indicate:

  1. what plant it is;
  2. where it is located (inside the house, on the terrace, in the garden, etc.);
  3. the type of exposure (full sun, half-light, etc.);
  4. how long has it been in your possession;
  5. the general state of the plant;
  6. the frequency of watering;
  7. how often it is fertilized and the type of fertilizer used;
  8. any pesticide treatments carried out;
  9. the symptoms it presents and the parts of the plant affect;
  10. any foreign presence (insects or other).

If possible, send a photo, but in any case, take care to be very detailed in describing the overall state of the plant. The address to which everything is forwarded is: [email protected]

Your questions


100 g of carob (edible part) provide 207 Calories divided as follows:

  • 91% carbohydrates
  • 6% protein
  • 3% lipids

In particular, 100 g of carob flour contain:

  • 3.7 g of water
  • 4.8 g of protein
  • 0.7 g of lipids, of which:
  • 0.1 g of saturated fat
  • 0.2 g of monounsaturated fat
  • 0.2 g of polyunsaturated fats (including about 4 mg of omega 3 and about 210 mg of omega 6)
  • 49 g of sugars
  • 40 g of fiber

Among the vitamins and minerals, in 100 g of carob flour there are:

  • 12 mg of choline
  • 1.9 mg of niacin
  • 0.6 mg of vitamin E
  • 0.5 mg of riboflavin
  • 0.4 mg of vitamin B6
  • 0.2 mg of vitamin C
  • 0.1 mg of thiamine
  • 14 IU of vitamin A
  • 29 µg of folate
  • 827 mg of potassium
  • 347 mg of calcium
  • 79 mg of phosphorus
  • 54 mg of magnesium
  • 35 mg of sodium
  • 2.9 mg of iron
  • 0.9 mg of zinc
  • 0.6 mg of copper
  • 0.5 mg of manganese
  • 5.3 µg of selenium

Carobs are also a source of tannins, such as gallic acid.


Carobs are harvested in summer.

Carobs are considered a good one substitute of the powder cocoa: rich in fiber, but low in fat, such as cocoa, they are a source of antioxidants, but do not contain caffeine.

Their nutritional properties could also make them an ally against cough, flu and osteoporosis, pain, allergies and viruses. However, carob is mainly used against problems gastrointestinalIn particular, diarrhea also appears to help fight cholesterol and protect the health of the throat and vocal cords. Finally, carob appears to be a precious ally of weight loss diets because it can inhibit some digestive enzymes and induce satiety.

The following information is general information and does not in any way replace medical advice. To ensure a healthy and balanced diet, it is always good to rely on the advice of your doctor or a nutrition expert.


Carobs are harvested in summer.

Carobs are considered a good substitute for cocoa powder: rich in fiber, but low in fat such as cocoa, they are a source of antioxidants, without the addition of caffeine.

Their nutritional properties could also make them an ally against coughs, flu, osteoporosis, allergies and viruses as well as having pain-relieving effects. However, carob beans are mainly used against gastrointestinal problems, in particular dysentery it also seems that they can help fight cholesterol and protect the health of the throat and vocal cords. Finally, they are believed to be valuable allies of weight loss diets because they can inhibit some digestive enzymes and induce satiety.

The information given here represents general information and does not in any way replace medical advice. For the purpose of a healthy and balanced diet, it is always good to rely on the advice of your doctor or a nutrition expert.


Legumes and meteorism

Although legumes are a very good food, the most sensitive subjects are unable to consume them without presenting themselves annoying intestinal problems this is because they contain the three oligosaccharides raffinose, stachyose and verbascose (in maximum quantities in dried legumes, minimum in beans and fresh peas) which are not digested by the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract and are fermented by the bacterial flora of the colon, with a considerable gas production.

Soaking the dried legumes is an operation that allows you to remove most of the anti-nutritional molecules and make them more digestible


Plant the ornamental trees

The biggest difference from planting any type of tree is perhaps the greater attention paid to it space where the tree will be inserted.
In a context urban, for example, there are gods distance parameters plants from houses that must be taken into consideration.
After obtaining the sapling, you need to insert it into one hole in the ground of about 80 cm wide is 50 cm deep. Once the hole is completely covered, it is necessary irrigate abundantly.


Son of Vittorio Bargioni and Maria Luisa Gaeta, he graduated in agriculture in Florence on November 5, 1948 with full marks and honors [1]. He had as teacher Alessandro Morettini [2].

He was director of the Ferrara fruit growing center from 1951 to 1954. From 1955 to 1990, the year of his retirement, he was director of the Experimental Fruit Growing Institute of the Province of Verona.

He introduced in vitro multiplication of plants. [without source] On the fruit species he carried out an intense research work on the cherry tree, producing among others the varieties of cherries called "Vittoria", "Adriana" and "Giorgia", of which the first particularly suitable for mechanized harvesting and able to detach without stalk from the plant.

A free teacher of tree cultivation, since 1964 he has taught viticulture at the University of Padua for six years. From 2004 to 2007 he was in charge of an olive growing course at the University of Verona.

He has been collaborator of numerous scientific journals and popularizer with about 400 publications including monographs and articles in journals.

The Accademia dei Georgofili commemorated him with a public meeting and study day on June 21, 2012. [5]

Giorgio Bargioni carried out innovative research on the root systems of plum, olive, vine, cherry, peach, pear, quince and persimmon in 1959 he identified allelopathy in some types of plants of the same species and studied the damage from flood to orchards.

He was among the first, in the early 1960s, to understand the importance of using plastic materials. [without source] He made a framework for the protection of a strawberry with transparent polyethylene and mulching on the row with black polyethylene already in 1957, and carried out some greenhouse cultivation tests of the peach tree by covering some trees of "Precocissima Morettini", whose fruits ripened with about one week in advance.

He carried out genetic improvement activities on the cherry tree. Through the controlled artificial crossing, starting from 1958 with Tiziano Tosi, he tried to contribute to the solution of the problem of fruit harvesting, to improve the assortment for the resistance to splitting and the ripening calendar.

One of the most important results was the "Vittoria" cherry variety, licensed in 1970, with excellent general characteristics, good productivity, excellent flavor and shelf life, the first variety in the world with the characteristic of being easily and completely suitable for mechanized harvesting [without source] and therefore intended mainly for industrial uses.

He also worked on the strawberry, encouraging and supporting the work of Tiziano Tosi, with whom he worked for the production of virus-free mother plants, for production in the mountains and for protected cultivation.

After the initial experiments on the floral biology of the olive tree, where he also characterized the Garda varieties (Bargioni, 1962), he published various contributions at multi-year intervals with repeated observations on cultivation techniques and pruning (Bargioni, 1982 Bargioni and Liut, 1989 Bargioni, 1992, Bargioni, 1994).

He was invited to lecture on the results of Veronese research in Switzerland (in Sion), in France (in Avignon, in Montpellier, in Agen, in Perpignan), in Belgium (in Gembloux), in Bulgaria (in Plovdiv, Sofia and Kjustendil ), in Hungary (Budapest). He collaborated with the Canadian Experimental Station of Summerland (British Columbia), which allowed the first evaluations of the new varieties and selections of self-fertile cherry and with the French station of La Grande Ferrade in Bordeaux for sweet cherry, as well as that within the Fruit Growing Group of the "Alpe Adria" working community which brings together the Regions and Länder bordering the Eastern Alps.

He wrote The sweet cherry, in 1982, he collaborated in the drafting of the treatises of Special Fruit Growing (1991), where he described "the cherry tree", of General Fruit Growing (1992) in which he developed the topics Pruning of fruit trees (Bargioni, 1992) and Choice and preparation of the soil (Bargioni, 1992) later in the publication Sweet Cherry Scion (1996) developed the themes of the variety assortment and the genetic improvement of the cherry tree, the latter topic also developed later on Fruitiere arboriculture (Bargioni et al., 1998a Bargioni et al., 1998b), and in the text The types of trees in stone fruit, where he described the bearing of the cherry tree (Bassi and Bargioni, 2003). Also worth mentioning is the extensive analysis on the evolution of Italian fruit growing in the twentieth century (Bargioni, 2001) and among the popular writings the manual The olive tree and its cultivation (2002).


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