What Is Pyola: Using Pyola Oil Spray For Pests In Gardens

What Is Pyola: Using Pyola Oil Spray For Pests In Gardens


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By: Bonnie L. Grant, Certified Urban Agriculturist

Finding safe and effective yard treatments for pests can be a challenge. There are plenty of non-toxic formulas on the market but the problem is that they don’t work well. Pyola is a brand name, all-natural formula that is effective on some problem pests. What is Pyola? The active ingredient is pyrethrin, which comes from a flower.

Garden sprays line the shelves of nurseries and big box stores. Many of these are broad spectrum, can get into our ground water and pollute it and have a tendency to drift, causing harm in areas that are not targets. If you must use insecticide, it should at least be safe enough to use around your family and not poison the water table. Pyola may be the product for you.

Is Pyola Safe to Use?

Exactly what is Pyola? The active ingredient, pyrethrin, comes from chrysanthemum flowers. Pyola insect spray uses a compound found in dried chrysanthemum flowers and mixes it with canola oil as the surfactant. This allows it to adhere to insects.

A sprayer is effective when using Pyola oil spray, as it must directly contact the pests to be effective. The product controls aphids, caterpillars, Colorado potato beetles, leafhoppers, armored scale and many more pests of vegetables and ornamental plants. The product kills on contact and consistent Pyola application can reduce seasonal pest levels because it will also kill eggs and larval insects.

Pyola Garden Use

Pyola is only 5% pyrethrins and the rest is canola oil. It comes as a concentrate and must be mixed with water. The container has instructions for a 1% Pyola application, which requires 2 teaspoons of concentrate with 1 quart of water. For a 2% Pyola insect spray, use 4 teaspoons with 1 quart of water.

Shake the mixture well in a sprayer. It has the unfortunate ability to remove the blue color from Spruce trees, so use caution when spraying near these. Some ornamental trees are sensitive to the product and require a 1% solution. Some of these are:

  • Cryptomeria
  • Japanese Holly
  • Chamaecyparis
  • Red Cedar
  • Smoke Tree

Using Pyola Oil Spray

There are several cautions listed on the bottle. Don’t over spray and allow the product to drip on the ground, do not allow children or pets into the area until the spray has dried, and don’t apply when it is windy.

You can’t use it within 10 days of a sulfur application, more than 10 times per year, or more than 3 days in a row. It is a non-specific insecticide that has the potential to harm your good bugs, too.

Word on the web is that it won’t harm honey bees, but I would take that with a grain of salt. As with most pesticide products, it is harmful to aquatic life and invertebrates, so use around a pond is unadvised.

All in all, Pyola garden use is safer than most of the chemical mixes out on the market, but some caution is also recommended.

This article was last updated on

Read more about Pesticides


Anyone use Pyola or Bulls-Eye?

Don't know if it's allowed to mention particular products here, but I'm trying to find someone who's used the products from Gardens Alive called:

Pyola Insecticidal Spray, and/or

They sound good, but I'd like to hear from folk who've actually used them.

Michaelg

Pyola is canola oil plus pyrethrins, an effective contact insecticide. It has no effect on insects that aren't sprayed directly, such as marauding beetles and katydids. It will kill other insects and mites if it is sprayed thoroughly where they are.

I have a product containing spinosad, like Bullseye, but I haven't needed to use any insecticide beyond soap this year. It has been trialed for thrips, caterpillars, and sawfly larvae, so there shouldn't be any problem with its effectiveness. It has a good environmental and hazard profile. Unlike Pyola it has some residual effect as a stomach poison for chewing insects.

I have used Soap Shield and it is an effective broad-spectrum fungicide. However, copper products are somewhat hazardous. For routine use, I prefer sulfur, even though it is not as effective.


Comments (7)

Sneezer2

Check out Serenade. I'm not sure of its effectiveness against Septoria Leaf Spot but it is an antifungal and I have used it with success against Early Blight. I've used it in combination with Soap Shield in an environment where I have serious early Blight problems and have managed to keep my plants healthy all season. Google for "serenade max" and you will find the Agraquest site. If you have remaining questions you can telephone them and ask. I have found Agraquest very helpful.

Sorry, I have just looked at the Agraquest site and something seems to be wrong but at least the product page shows up for Serenade and their phone number.

Gardens Alive has the same product which they buy in bulk from Agraquest and sell under a different name. Pyola is an insecticide and, though useful, will not affect a fungus infection.

Be careful of those $25 coupons. I also have used them before but found that they are not really worth the trouble. Gardens Alive puts together bags and bottles of otherwise common stuff, places a fancy name on it, sells it at a truly exorbitant price, then gives you the favor of a "coupon". Also notice how the price structure works so that what you want always seems to end up just 10 or 20 cents shy of the coupon minimum, so you have to then buy something "extra". Gardens alive is a division of the company that owns those other companies which advertise cheap flower bulbs, etc. in the Sunday supplements. I don't stay away from them entirely but I do find that with a little extra research I can find the equivalent of most of their products and have a lot more for a lot less money.

For instance, the last time I looked at their prices (last year), they were getting about $50 a pound for their bag of Serenade (without coupon). However, you could get it at the time from your local farm store for about $12 a pound. You had to buy it in a larger quantity (12 lb or 6 lb bag) but if you get the powder it lasts forever. You can use one bag over several years or share with friends. Prices may be different this year. The folks at your farm store may not be familiar with the product, depending on where you are but in most cases they can get it for you if you help them a little. Go to uap.com and find the local rep, then give him a call. He should either suggest a dealer who will order for you or may even sell directly.

Serenade is a good product. It works and is not poisonous. Hope this helps.


Pyola Insect Spray - Information On Pyola Garden Use - garden

Chemical Recommendations (ONE PER APPLICATION)

Special Recommendations (& read label instructions)

Dormant or Horticulture Oil (Superior Oil, Bonide All Seasons Horticultural & Dormant Spray Oil)

Only use if pests present previous year.

Temperatures should be above 45 and cannot drop below freezing for 24 hours.

Mancozeb (Bonide Mancozeb Flowable with Zinc. NOTE: PHI of 77, so only for early season use)

Copper if fire blight present in previous two growing seasons.

Mancozeb for scab, bitter rot, black rot.

Copper and Mancozeb can be mixed.

Captan (Bonide Captan 50W FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY, Hi-Yield Captan 50W, Fruit Guard, Fruit Tree Spray and Home Orchard Spray FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY)

Myclobutanil (Spectricide Immunox Multi-purpose Fungicide Spray FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY)

Multipurpose Fruit Spray (Some may contain Strobiluren some scab may have developed a resistence to this chemical) FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY

Mancozeb (Bonide Mancozeb Flowable with Zinc. NOTE: PHI of 77, so only for early season use)

Allow more than 10 days to spray Captan after Dormant Oil

Apple Scab
Powdery Mildew

Myclobutanil NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Ferti-Lome F-Stop, Spectracide Immunox Multi-Purpose Fungicide)

Potassium bicarbonate NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Bi-Carb Old Fashioned Fungicide, Green Cure Fungicide)

Sulfur (Bonide Sulfur Plant Fungicide, Ferti-Lome Dusting Sulfur, Hi-Yield Dusting Wettable Sulfur and Safer Garden Fungicide)

Apple Scab
Powdery Mildew
Cedar Apple Rust

Potassium bicarbonate NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Green Cure Fungicide). For light disease/pathogen pressure.

Sulfur (Bonide Sulfur Plant Fungicide, Ferti-Lome Dusting Sulfur, Hi-Yield Dusting Wettable Sulfur and Safer Garden Fungicide)

Mancozeb (Bonide Mancozeb Flowable with Zinc. NOTE: PHI of 77, so only for early season use)

Apple Scab
Powdery Mildew
Cedar Apple Rust

Rosy Apple Aphid
Codling Moth

Check Codling Moth traps for first catch (Biofix)

Petal Fall
(when last petals are falling)

Powdery Mildew
Cedar Apple Rust
Bitter Rot
Black Rot

Rosy Apple Aphid
Wooly Apple Aphid
San Jose Scale
European Red Mite

Bifenthrin NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Bonide Eight Insect Control Flower and Vegetable, Ortho Bug-B-Gone Insect Killer for Lawns and Gardens)

Insecticidal Soap (Bayer Advanced Natria Insecticidal Soap, Bonide Insecticidal Soap, Earth-tone Insecticidal Soap, Garden Safe Insecticidal Soap, Ortho Elements Insecticidal Soap, Safer 3 n 1 Garden Spray, Safer Fruit and Vegetable Insect Killer, Safer Insect Killing Soap)

Spray foliage, scout and repeat if label requires

First cover
(10 Days after petal Fall

Bitter Rot
Black Rot
Codling moth
Plum Curculio

Canola oil (Bayer Advanced Natria Multi-Insect Control, Earth-tone Insect Control, Gardens Alive Pyola Insect Spray, Ortho Elementals Garden Insect Killer)

Imidacloprid (Bayer Advanced Fruit, Citrus and Vegetable Insect Killer NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY, Bonide Annual Tree And Shrub Insect Killer, Ferti-Lome Tree and Shrub Systemic, Hi-Yield Systemic Insect)

Insecticidal Soap (Bayer Advanced Natria Insecticidal Soap, Bonide Insecticidal Soap, Earth-tone Insecticidal Soap, Garden Safe Insecticidal Soap, Ortho Elements Insecticidal Soap, Safer 3 n 1 Garden Spray, Safer Fruit and Vegetable Insect Killer, Safer Insect Killing Soap)

Malathion NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Bonide Malathion, Bonide Fruit Tree Spray)

Captan (not “with Carbyrl”—label doesn’t allow enough applications. Mix your own Captan + )

Permethrin (Bayer Advanced Complete Insect Dust for Gardens, Hi-Yield Indoor Outdoor Broad Use Pesticide)

Spinosad (Bonide Captain Jack’s Dead bug Brew, Conserve, Gardens Alive Bulls-Eye Bioinsecticide, Natural Guard Spinosad Landscape and Garden Insecticide)

Second Cover (10 Days after First Cover)

Bitter Rot
Black Rot
Codling Moth
Apple Maggot
Plum Curculio
Sooty Blotch
Flyspeck

Apple Maggot and Plum curculio

Captan (not “with Carbyrl”—label doesn’t allow enough applications. Mix your own Captan + )

Permethrin (Bayer Advanced Complete Insect Dust for Gardens, Hi-Yield Indoor Outdoor Broad Use Pesticide)

Spinosad (Bonide Captain Jack’s Dead bug Brew, Conserve, Gardens Alive Bulls-Eye Bioinsecticide, Natural Guard Spinosad Landscape and Garden Insecticide)

Codling Moth (2nd Generation)

Carbaryl - (Sevin Bonide Fruit Tree Spray FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY)

Insecticidal Soap - (Bayer Advanced Natria Insecticidal Soap, Bonide Insecticidal Soap, Earth-tone Insecticidal Soap, Garden Safe Insecticidal Soap, Ortho Elements Insecticidal Soap, Safer 3 n 1 Garden Spray, Safer Fruit and Vegetable Insect Killer, Safer Insect Killing Soap)

Malathion - For NON-COMMERCIAL USE ONLY (Bonide Malathion, Bonide Fruit Tree Spray)

If you compare the rate of an insecticide by itself (like carbaryl), then by how much is in orchard spray premixes, you will find the orchard spray is SIGNIFICANTLY less and may not provide sufficient insect control. Better off tank mixing individual components in many cases.

Know the pH of your water source and how it may change efficacy.

To reduce likelihood of resistance, never use one active ingredient for more than two applications in a row.

For codling moth, alternate active ingredients


Although these questions should be asked every time you step into your Growing Dome, pest management is most crucial at three times in a plants life cycle.

Seeding, fruiting, and plant death are the times in which a plant is the most vulnerable to attack.

1- Once seedlings have sprouted from the ground:

At the beginning stages of a plants life, the ratio of soil to plant foliage is imbalanced. Having exposed soil means that your Growing Dome beds will likely retain more moisture. Unfortunately, high soil moisture is the perfect environment for pests, specifically the Roly Poly (aka, Pill Bug).

Moisture & The Rolly Poly:

The best way to prevent a Pill Bug infestation is to strictly monitor soil moisture and ensure your beds are not accumulating too much mulch at this time. For more detailed information on managing the Rolly Poly, click here.

2- During initial flowering and fruiting:

The process of fruiting draws sugar and water to the buds of your plants. This high concentration of sugar is the perfect habitat for pest to leach off the bioavailable nutrients. You may notice higher numbers of Mealybug during flowering and Thrips during fruiting. You can find a detailed article about Thrips management here.

Fruiting & The Mealybug:

As far as Mealybug is concerned, the most immediate and effective way to manage this pest is to take a Q-tip, cotton ball, or spray bottle, soak it in a solution of Dr. Bronners, and wipe the area clean. If you’re experiencing Mealybug on non-fruiting plants, it is safe to use a Neem Oil solution. However, using Neem Oil on fruiting plants can stunt their growth.

3- After fruiting is complete:

The final time to pay attention to pest management is immediately after your plants have stopped producing. Once a plant stops producing, the remaining energy of the plant is returned to the soil. As a result, the immune system of these plants are compromised, which means you’re likely to find pests at this time.

Decomposition & Aphids:

Although aphids can appear at any time in a garden, decaying plant matter makes garden beds particularly prone to aphid infestation. It is important to keep your beds clear of decaying plant matter in order to prevent an infestation of pests. You can find a detailed article on aphid management here.


Watch the video: Organic Pest Control. Water u0026 DIY Peppermint Oil Spray. Spider Mites u0026 Aphids on Cucumbers


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