Best indoor plants for cleaning air nasa

Best indoor plants for cleaning air nasa


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The whole of India is reeling under smog and pollutants that are floating in air. Heavy smog has engulfed the city into a gloomy state of grey and you sure must be worrying about the health of your close ones as well as yourself. We are often asked to plant trees to curb pollution but did you know that not just trees, but house plants are also a great way to counter pollution? The American space agency, NASA released a list of house plants that are effective in purifying the air at homes. Here are a few easily available, hardy, really difficult to kill house plants that will help you fight back air pollution in your homes this year!

Content:
  • Related Articles
  • The best air purifying plants for your home
  • 12 Best Air Purifying Indoor Plants You Won’t Kill!
  • A Popular Benefit of Houseplants Is a Myth
  • 5 Air Purifying Plants Your Home Needs
  • Indoor Plants and the NASA Air Quality Study
  • NASA Clean Air Study
  • NASA’s Top 10 Air-Cleaning Plants
  • Top 10 NASA Approved Houseplants for Improving Indoor Air Quality
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: A NASA study explains how to purify air with house plants

Related Articles

We spend a lot of time indoors, making healthy indoor air quality a top priority. Great news for lovers of houseplants like pothos, pictured above! Still, every bit helps, right? And do we really need another reason to fill our homes with natural beauty?

Read on to find out the top air-purifying plants that aid in the removal of pollutants such as formaldehyde, benzene, trichloroethylene and carbon monoxide. Remember: Some plants and plant parts can be toxic. Keep them out of the reach of children and pets. Beautiful as a groundcover or a houseplant, English ivy is a classically elegant choice that is also excellent for removing harmful chemicals found in the home.

It can grow in full shade to full sun, can be trained into shapes and with proper care, it is likely to survive for several years. Since the bamboo palm, or reed palm, prefers part sun or shade, it makes a great houseplant with the added benefit of aiding in the removal of harmful elements such as benzene and formaldehyde.

The Chinese evergreen is an easy-care plant that thrives in low to medium light. It generally grows to 1 or 2 feet. Though it helps to maintain healthy air quality in the home, it is important to note that the Chinese evergreen contains an irritant that can be toxic to pets. When placed indoors, this popular annual is useful in removing benzene and providing mood-enhancing beauty to the home. However, keep in mind that the gerbera daisy does best in warm temperatures, at 75 degrees or higher.

With a leaf color that ranges from green to purple, this plant would be a gorgeous addition indoors or outdoors. It would also fit right in at the office, as it can tolerate low light.

A hardy succulent, mother-in-law's tongue is a great houseplant for beginners and can survive in some of the toughest conditions, including a wide variety of temperatures and light conditions.

However, be careful not to overwater or to not water at all. Good for removing benzene, the pot mum is also a colorful addition to the home in fall when many other flowering plants are past their prime. Known for its ability to fight against toxic gases such as formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, peace lilies are relatively easy to care for and even show signs of drooping when they need to be watered. They can be mildly toxic to pets and humans, so it's important to wash your hands after touching the plant.

This easy to care for houseplant thrives in bright, indirect light and works hard to remove the air of harmful pollutants like formaldehyde and benzene. Spider plants dislike soggy soil, so let them dry out slightly between waterings. They look stunning in tree form but can also be grown as shrubs. Rubber trees have been shown to absorb and break down harmful chemicals in the air. Their large, glossy leaves also take in the carbon dioxide we exhale and convert it to oxygen.

Grow them in well-drained potting soil, water regularly and apply liquid fertilizer when they're actively growing. Lemon button rerns, relatives of Boston ferns, are useful for removing toxins and cleaning indoor air. They grow about a foot high and thrive in indirect light as long as they have sufficient humidity. They're more drought tolerant than most ferns, so let their soil dry out slightly before watering again. Pothos earned high marks in a NASA clean air study for clearing the air of benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, carbon monoxide and xylene.

These vining tropicals tolerate low light, although it may make their leaves revert to solid green. Use them in hanging baskets or containers and let them trail over the edge of a table. Philodendrons come in a variety of sizes and colors, and their leaves can have many different shapes.

Like 'Xanadu,' the variety shown here, these plants adapt easily to most homes with medium to bright, indirect light. Researchers say they remove indoor toxins like formaldehyde, which may be present in carpets and cleaning products. Also See: Philodendron Care. Parlor palms, popular during the Victorian Era, are still popular today, thanks in part to their ability to adapt to the low light conditions found in most homes.

According to NASA's study on plants that clean the air, they can also remove benzene and trichloroethylene from your home or workplace. Aloes are easy-to-grow succulents and clean the air of benzene and formaldehyde when given off by paints, cleaners with chemical ingredients and other products. The plants need a sunny spot in your home.

Grow them in a cactus potting mix or add perlite or sand to a regular potting mix to improve drainage. Use the gel from a piece of broken or cut aloe to treat minor burns. Known as broad lady palm or broadleaf lady palm, this plant can reduce the ammonia found in some indoor cleaning products. It also filters out benzene, nitrogen oxide, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene. Tolerant of low light, these palms can grow to six feet tall, so they're ideal for dim corners. They like moist soil but need good drainage.

Commonly called nerve plants, fittonias are low-maintenance houseplants that filter toluene, benzene and trichloroethylene from indoor air. This variety, 'Frankie,' has pink and green leaves, while others have white and green or green and red foliage. Fittonias grow 3 to 6 inches high, so they're perfect for terrariums and dish gardens.

Give them high humidity, moist, well-drained soil and bright, indirect light. NASA found that ficus trees, or weeping figs, improve indoor air by removing pollutants like formaldehyde and xylene.

Weeping figs are very sensitive, and their leaves can turn yellow and drop when you move them to a new location or change your watering habits. The leaves usually grow back when the plant adjusts. Most ficus like bright indirect or filtered light. Give your plant high humidity and wait until the top of the soil is dry before watering.

This evergreen plant, red anthurium, is also known as flamingo lily for its flamboyant flowers. Anthuriums need bright, indirect light and high humidity, so mist them regularly and keep their soil moist, but not soggy. Photo By: Image courtesy of Costa Farms. Photo By: Costa Farms. Photo By: Courtesy Costa Farms. Home Design Remodel Interior Remodel. Discover the top 20 air purifying plants that aid in the removal of pollutants.

Keep in mind: Price and stock could change after publish date, and we may make money from these links. January 15,Pinterest Facebook Twitter Email. By: Keri Sanders. Houseplants for Health We spend a lot of time indoors, making healthy indoor air quality a top priority. Hedera helix Beautiful as a groundcover or a houseplant, English ivy is a classically elegant choice that is also excellent for removing harmful chemicals found in the home.

Shop Online. English Ivy. Chamaedorea seifrizii Since the bamboo palm, or reed palm, prefers part sun or shade, it makes a great houseplant with the added benefit of aiding in the removal of harmful elements such as benzene and formaldehyde. Bamboo Palm. Aglaonema modestum The Chinese evergreen is an easy-care plant that thrives in low to medium light. Chinese Evergreen. Gerbera jamesonii When placed indoors, this popular annual is useful in removing benzene and providing mood-enhancing beauty to the home.

Gerbera Daisy. Dracaena marginata With a leaf color that ranges from green to purple, this plant would be a gorgeous addition indoors or outdoors. Dragon Tree. Sansevieria trifasciata 'Laurentii' A hardy succulent, mother-in-law's tongue is a great houseplant for beginners and can survive in some of the toughest conditions, including a wide variety of temperatures and light conditions. From: Lynn Coulter. Mother-in-Law's Tongue Plant.

Chrysanthemum morifolium Good for removing benzene, the pot mum is also a colorful addition to the home in fall when many other flowering plants are past their prime.

Spathiphyllum 'Mauna Loa' Known for its ability to fight against toxic gases such as formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, peace lilies are relatively easy to care for and even show signs of drooping when they need to be watered. Peace Lily. Chlorophytum comosum 'Vittatum' This easy to care for houseplant thrives in bright, indirect light and works hard to remove the air of harmful pollutants like formaldehyde and benzene.

Spider Plant. Mass Cane Corn Plant. Ficus elastica Rubber trees have been shown to absorb and break down harmful chemicals in the air. Rubber Tree. Nephrolepis cordifolia Lemon button rerns, relatives of Boston ferns, are useful for removing toxins and cleaning indoor air. Lemon Button Fern. Epipremnum aureum Pothos earned high marks in a NASA clean air study for clearing the air of benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, carbon monoxide and xylene.

Golden Pothos Plant. Philodendron Philodendrons come in a variety of sizes and colors, and their leaves can have many different shapes. Chamaedorea elegans Parlor palms, popular during the Victorian Era, are still popular today, thanks in part to their ability to adapt to the low light conditions found in most homes. Parlor Palm. Aloe barbadensis Miller Aloes are easy-to-grow succulents and clean the air of benzene and formaldehyde when given off by paints, cleaners with chemical ingredients and other products.


The best air purifying plants for your home

We generally think that indoor air is safer than outdoor air, but we are wrong! English ivy is an evergreen perennial vine and is a super climber. It is useful for cleansing benzene and toluene. One research also indicated that English ivy could also reduce mold in the home. With spiderettes growing out from the mother plant, it makes it appear as baby spiders are dangling down from the pot! The Spider Plant is also useful in removing carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene.

This plant topped NASA's list in terms of the amount of VOCs removed. As a houseplant, the peace lily is known for being easy to grow and a great choice for.

12 Best Air Purifying Indoor Plants You Won’t Kill!

Worried about indoor air quality as pollution and CO2 levels rise? However, some house plants possess additional air-purifying benefits making them a popular addition to home and office designs. But is it proven if plants actually purify the air? Which air-purifying plants are the best? How many air-purifying indoor plants would be sufficient to keep your air clean? Air-purifying indoor plants have been all the rage ever since a NASA study championed the air-purifying benefits of houseplants. The study revealed that plants have the ability to reduce indoor air pollutants. While there is no doubt that plants can remove volatile chemical toxins from the air, some critics claim that houseplants make a negligible difference in improving the cleanliness levels of indoor air.

A Popular Benefit of Houseplants Is a Myth

Another benefit other than displaying a plant within the home or office for visual purposes is the purification and filtering of certain toxins and pollutants within the air. NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration tested all the air cleaning house plants listed below within their space stations strange as that seems but true. I have included the top 10 plants that were part of NASA's clean air study as mentioned above. For more information about the study check out the wiki article.

The study, led by Dr.

5 Air Purifying Plants Your Home Needs

Using space station technology to ensure the safety of your home may be easier than you thought. As our homes become more insulated and efficient, they also make it easier to trap indoor air pollutants. Neglecting the quality of the air you breathe on a daily basis could result in serious consequences. Illness, allergies, asthma and frequent headaches are just a few of many inconveniences that come from airborne particles floating around your home. Air pollution is also one of the reasons the can affect your digestive system. According to NASA there are plenty of plants that soak up harmful particles in the air and release fresh oxygen — all while adding a decorative touch.

Indoor Plants and the NASA Air Quality Study

The PNW really has great, fresh air, but with the threat of wild fires up here, it can turn pretty quickly. Thankfully, house plants do a great job of helping to clean the air naturally. There is literally a list of air-filtering plants that are proven to help filter harmful toxins and pollutants out of the air. Cool, huh? Not gonna lie, Dracaena is my favorite plant on this list! I love the height that it adds to the overall space, but it is also a very good air purifier. This striking house plant is known to filter out benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, and xylene from the air.

In this study, the leaves, roots, soil, and associated microorganisms of plants have been evaluated as a possible means of reducing indoor.

NASA Clean Air Study

In honor of this little-known holiday, we wanted to take a closer look at the top ten houseplants that have the ability to naturally improve the air quality in your home. All of these indoor houseplants were analyzed by NASA inThey found that each had a unique way to naturally cleanse the air of toxins that have a negative effect to your health.

NASA’s Top 10 Air-Cleaning Plants

RELATED VIDEO: Best Air Purifying Plants ( For Indoor / Outdoor ) Classified to NASA

Bringing plants indoors is a sustainable way to improve indoor air quality quickly. Yep, one commonly cited NASA study found certain plants to be useful in absorbing harmful gasses and cleaning indoor air. Though houseplants won't clear the air nearly as much as, say, an air filter , they come with other bonuses too: They're aesthetically pleasing and can make us feel more connected to nature, content, and calm at home. Here are seven detoxifying plant varieties that can tolerate moderate to low light levels. Consider them the building blocks of any great indoor jungle.

Bringing plants indoors can provide a number of benefits, but cleaner air isn't one of them, say experts.

Top 10 NASA Approved Houseplants for Improving Indoor Air Quality

About Help Login. Back to Results Interior Landscape Plants for Indoor Air Pollution Abatement In this study, the leaves, roots, soil, and associated microorganisms of plants have been evaluated as a possible means of reducing indoor air pollutants. Additionally, a novel approach of using plant systems for removing high concentrations of indoor air pollutants such as cigarette smoke, organic solvents, and possibly radon has been designed from this work. This air filter design combines plants with an activated carbon filter. The rationale for this design, which evolved from wastewater treatment studies, is based on moving large volumes of contaminated air through an activated carbon bed where smoke, organic chemicals, pathogenic microorganisms if present , and possibly radon are absorbed by the carbon filter.

Plants not only brighten up your room with a refreshing splash of nature, but they are also scientifically proven to purify the air in your home. Decorative and practical, they are silent helpers that clean the air and bring life into the room. Here are 7 popular examples of air-purifying plants.



Comments:

  1. Cottus

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  3. Tadd

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  4. Ferhan

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  5. Jaymes

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